New Horizons

Ankara Research Center of Energy Efficiency in Electrical Household Appliances

Podcast 113

In this episode, we talk about a project which aims to build a basis for academic research on energy efficient household appliances and to contribute to public awareness on energy efficiency and hence where a research center has been built with this project. 

Faik Uyanık: This is the New Horizons podcasts prepared by United Nations Development Programme in Turkey. In this episode, we talk about a project which aims to build a basis for academic research on energy efficient household appliances and to contribute to public awareness on energy efficiency and hence where a research center has been built with this project. Our contributor is from Ankara University. He is the Head of Electrical and Electronic Engineering Department in Faculty of Engineering. Prof. Dr. Hakkı Gökhan İlk. Welcome.

Hakkı Gökhan İlk: I am glad to be here.

Faik Uyanık: I should say that this project has been supported by grant programme of Market Transformation of Energy Efficient Appliances which is implemented by the General Directorate for Renewable Energy (GDRE) of the Ministry of Energy and Natural Resources and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) with the financial assistance of the Global Environment Facility (GEF). The grant programme was started for universities in 2014 and we also announced it. 5 university projects on energy efficiency of electrical household appliances was supported. And one of them is yours from Ankara University. You have a project named ‘Ankara Research Center of Energy Efficiency in Electrical Household Appliances’. This is the full name of your project. What is the purpose of this? How did the idea come up?

Hakkı Gökhan İlk: First, I would like to wish a good day for everyone. The main theme of our project was to establish an energy efficiency laboratory within Ankara University, in Ankara. This constituted the academic and scientific side of our project. According to the project proposal prepared for UNDP, we were required to prepare and open a course about the topic. This course could be either undergraduate or a graduate course. We preferred to open this course as an elective undergraduate course. The course is not only for students of Electrical and Electronic Engineering Department, but for all the students in Faculty of Engineering. The course code is ELE311 and it is titled Introduction to Energy Efficiency.

Faik Uyanık: So now engineering students can take this elective course.

Hakkı Gökhan İlk: Starting from this semester, from September 2014 Fall Semester on, this course has started. It is 2 hours of theory and 2 hours of practice. The practical part is held in the laboratory that I just mentioned. The aim of the course is to raise awareness on importance of energy efficiency and train new generations on the significance of energy efficiency. Because, as you know, the appliances can be made energy efficient and consumption-sensitive with the right design. Actually, to pass this awareness to next generations and to educate conscious engineers who will make designs on this subject is extremely important.

Faik Uyanık:So it has a long name, I have said it in the beginning. ‘Ankara Research Center of Energy Efficiency in Electrical Household Appliances’. There is a website called evatev.com for this center. If interested, you can visit the website. It was a 9-month project. You started at the beginning of 2014, I guess on February. Until today, what did you do with this project? The project ended in October and you still receive results. Could you talk about this process?

Hakkı Gökhan İlk: Well, actually 9 months was a very short period of time for a project like this. So we realized we made some commitments that are very ambitious. I should say the establishment of the laboratory literally overwhelmed us because we established it and naturally it was in an isolated place. This is very important for replicability of tests and experiments. The laboratory is heat, light and sound-proof. So we have built an structure in which you can repeat the experiments and get the same results if you follow the standards. Then we completed a machine and equipment park to be used in this structure, with the support of the institutions we have just named. And the laboratory was all set before September because, as you know, in September we started the energy efficiency course.

Faik Uyanık: In this episode, we are talking about a project on Market Transformation of Energy Efficient Appliances. You can share your thoughts and make contributions to this episode by using #YeniUfuklar hashtag on Twitter. We are together with Hakkı Gökhan İlk, from Ankara University. It was important to establish the center. Let us talk more about the Center, what is being done and what will be done in there?

Hakkı Gökhan İlk: Of course, we have provided the necessary conditions by establishing its basic structure and supplying the machines and equipment, however there is still a lot of work to do beyond this point. So what are these? As you know, there is so called wet group in electrical household appliances, including equipments like washing machine, dishwasher. Except this wet group, we can measure energy efficiency of all electrical household appliances that comes to your mind. In our laboratory, we have the structure to measure energy efficiency of all electrical household appliances that you can think of, such as refrigerator, lighting group, iron, tea-coffee machines. We measure the energy efficiency of these appliances with the consideration of certain standards and also with the consideration of other parameters which are not among the standard parameters and which we work on in our scientific studies and we think they are important for measuring energy efficiency performance of an appliance.

Faik Uyanık: Now let us talk about the elective course more. We have mentioned that it is in the course list from this semester on. What do we teach to students? What is the situation in academic world on this matter? Is energy efficiency really getting a place in Faculty of Engineering curricula? What is your observation?

Hakkı Gökhan İlk: Traditionally, we do not teach energy efficiency in Electrical and Electronical Engineering Departments. However, as you know topics of sustainable energy, clean energy, energy efficiency which can be also defined as conscious consumption of energy have recently become very important. Energy efficiency is very popular and these topics appeared to be very important in the agenda. So within the scope of our project, we opened a course on this. I suppose this course would be opened eventually. However the laboratory would always be a problem in the sense of lack of financial resources and lack of putting into implementation as soon as possible. In this sense, I believe the project was very beneficial in this sense.

Faik Uyanık: To observe the field, the market, and the habits must be quite significant in the implementation process of the project. You were a five people working in the project. And we have Işıl Şirin Selçuk from the project team. Thank you for being here. You are a PhD candidate in the same department. Let’s talk about the consumption side in Turkey. What were your observations during the process?

Işıl Şirin Selçuk: When we look at the demand side of the story in Turkey, we see that small appliances are consumed by households. When we have a close look at the households, we see that the device that causes electrical consumption most is the refrigerator. There are a lot of reasons behind this. To begin with, 98% of all houses, meaning almost in all houses, there is a refrigerator. In addition, refrigerator is a device that constantly works and opening and closing the door increases energy consumption. So we see that the refrigerator is important in this sense. However, when we look at the recent trends, air conditioners also draw our attention. In 2000s there weren’t air conditioners in most of the houses, whereas now we observe a massive increase in the demand. So we believe there are serious opportunities and facts that worth paying attention in cooling and heating.

Faik Uyanık: We can say that especially devices like refrigerators and air conditioners consume more energy. And you developed the project based on these observations. I will again ask Prof. Dr. Hakkı Gökhan İlk. Project has come to an end. What do you think is the impact of this grant programme on your work, given by Market Transformation of Energy Efficient Appliances project?

Hakkı Gökhan İlk: GEF, Ministry of Energy and Natural Resources General Directorate of Renewable Energy and UNDP, as you know, these are very important institutions. I believe it was very important that our project was implemented with the support of these honorable institutions. Maybe, in some way we would be able to establish this laboratory with private or public resources; however the project certainly would not be this effective and this popular. Also as I said, these academic or scientific projects can take years to be completed. We would not have accomplished this in 9 months without the support. Of course another aspect of the project is industrial. It is true that we have established the laboratory for educational reasons. However, since we have established it in proper standards, SMEs or big producers can use our center for energy labeling, measuring and evaluations. So this is the concrete aspect of the project. Therefore, during the design phase before production, if there is a request to benefit from our scientific and academic ideas, our laboratory is open.

Faik Uyanık: There is information available on evatev.com. Your center studies on production as much as consumption. Of course policies have an impact for achieving the market transformation of energy efficient appliances. Presumably, decision makers will receive these messages. Last question, what you have told us is good until now, however sustainability is also important. What are you planning, how will you ensure to sustain your outcomes and to get better results?

Hakkı Gökhan İlk: For me, the most important step was the opening of the introductory course because we do not teach only scientific subjects to our engineers. We teach the social, economical and cultural importance of energy efficiency because if they work on energy efficient products, make the designs accordingly, and promote the energy efficient products, we will contribute to carbon emissions at the leastwise. We have a serious contribution to the environment. So this is not a subject just to be observed by electrical electronical engineering point of view. This is actually a phenomenon affecting the ecosystem, the natural environment we live in. This course will be given every fall semester. I believe next generation engineers will be more sensitive on the subject. Plus, the laboratory will be there as long as the department exists. So if there are any institutions or persons who would like to make measurements or evaluations, they can use the laboratory. Therefore, I do not think that this is a temporary project. I clearly see that this is sustainable.

Faik Uyanık: A very important center for Turkey, a country who does not have abundant energy resources. Thank you very much for joining us today. Congratulations again on your success!

Hakkı Gökhan İlk: Thank you very much. Have a nice day.

Faik Uyanık: This week our guests were Prof Dr.Hakkı Gökhan İlk from Ankara University and Işıl Şirin Selçuk from the project team. We come to the end of New Horizons podcasts prepared by UNDP in Turkey. This program has been recorded at the studio of Radyo İlef of Ankara University Communications Department. You can follow our program on iTunes, Soundcloud, TuneIn, Pure Connect and Audioboo in podcast format, on FM frequency in İstanbul, on Açık Radyo (Open Radio) on internet, on nearly fifty Police radios, on MYCY radio from Cyprus and also on university radios in our broadcasting network and on tr.undp.org. Our user name for social media is undpturkiye. Hope to see you soon, good bye!

Contributors:

Prof. Dr. Hakkı Gökhan İlk, Electrical and Electronic Engineering Department in Faculty of Engineering, Ankara University

Işıl Şirin Selçuk, Ankara University

Reklamlar
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New Horizons

Future is in Tourism with Misi and Seferihisar

Podcast 112

This episode is about two successful sustainable tourism projects that show us future is in tourism.

Faik Uyanık: This is the 112th episode of New Horizons podcasts of United Nations Development Programme in Turkey. In this season, we will continue to share development stories from UNDP who works for a more productive, greener and more equal world. Today’s episode is about two successful sustainable tourism projects that show us future is in tourism. First term projects of Future is in Tourism Sustainable Tourism Support Fund, carried out in partnership of Anadolu Efes, Ministry of Culture and Tourism, and United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) to support local development, is completed. In this episode, we will tell you stories of two projects out of three supported in the first term of Future is in Tourism Sustainable Tourism Support Fund. One of the projects supported by Future is in Tourism was %100 Misia. ‘%100 Misia’ project aimed to unearth thousands of years of cultural heritage hidden in 2,000 years old Misi village of Bursa and improve employment opportunities by reviving silkworm breeding which was main source of livelihood in the village before. Arzu Kutucu Özenen who gives voluntary consultancy to the project talks about the ‘%100 Misia’ Project:

Arzu Kutucu Özenen: Even though there are two main focuses in the project,general objective was to establish a tourism cluster within Misi. More precisely, furnishing two houses and preparing them to begin their trade lifes will be the core of this tourism cluster. Both of these houses are officially certified Misi houses which have at least 150 years of history. There will be a restaurant in the Cocoon House which is one of the houses. In this restaurant, traditional food of Bursa will be cooked rather than “fast food” of Turkish traditional cuisine, like gözleme and çiğ börek. We wanted visitors to feel at home and therefore, we decorated each room in the House with a different concept similar to old Bursa style. There is a black oven in our garden. Meals and different kinds of breads will be cooked and baked in this black oven; homemade noodle, tomato sauce, pickles workshops will be organized when their season come. The second one, whose name is Silk House, is also core for this tourism cluster. In the Silk House, all the phases from forming silk to its knitting will be implemented, and these products will be sold in this store. However, our goal by establishing silkworm breeding craft here is to revive the traditional livelihood of Misi.

Faik Uyanık: The owner of %100 Misia project is a women’s association: Nilufer Misi Village Women’s Cultural and Beneficiary Association. Nagihan Dülger, head of the Association tells that when they apply to Future is in Tourism, they aimed to diversify income generation activities especially for women and revive silkworm breeding which provided livelihood before.

Nagihan Dülger: All women who work in our association are housewives, meaning they are dependent on their husbands. The main objective of our association is that. We were thinking with my husband, about how everybody’s land was sold in the village, there are too many people who don’t own a land. They do not have a field to plow. Everybody sold their land once they went out of money. All women are dependent on their husbands. All of them are graduated from elementary school. They do not have the opportunity to find a decent job. It requires experience. We wanted them to earn money. I spoke with my neighbors, they welcomed the idea. “It is really great, we will work” they said.

Faik Uyanık: %100 Misia aims to create an exemplary tourism model through which women’s labor is valued and silkworm breeding, traditional livelihood of the region, is revived. For that purpose, Misi women took trainings on many topics such as English language courses and entrepreneurship courses. Nagihan Dülger talks about these trainings:

Nagihan Dülger:  We started last year. We took courses on related topics. We took English lessons, point lace lessons, courses on cocoon flowers, we did not know these before. Our elderly people knew however they only made them for themselves because it was not something to be sold. We gave entrepreneurship courses; we attended these courses as well. We had members who benefited from KOSGEB.

Faik Uyanık: Misi Village is a significant tourism destination. However Misi women want to bring sustainable tourism perspective to their village with %100 Misia project. Arzu talks about Misi Village’s tourism capacity and their understanding of tourism:

Arzu Kutucu Özenen: I think 2,500 visitors come to Misi every weekend most of which is from Bursa. Visitors who are not from Bursa are usually coming here with their relatives/friends from Bursa. Our goal is not to increase the number of visitors, but raising awareness within the visitors and making them prone to cultural tourism.

Faik Uyanık: Asiye Kürklü, a founding member of the Association, describes what kind of added value Future is in Tourism brought for their work:

Asiye Kürklü: Nobody believed in us when we first established the association. Even the villagers told us “You cannot make it”. They gave us a couple of months, with the thoughts “This place cannot be managed by women”. This is our fourth year. That supported us, gave us self-esteem. This project made us think that we can do better things, it gave us an excitement.

Faik Uyanık: New Horizons prepared by UNDP Turkey continues. You can ask questions and share your thoughts with #YeniUfuklar hashtag on Twitter. Let us go on. Asiye Kürklü, founding member of the association, summarizes what has changed in her life with this project:

Asiye Kürklü: I have enjoyed producing, earning, having my own money. There was no such thing before. It is good for me.

Faik Uyanık: Another project granted by Future is in Tourism – Sustainable Tourism Support Fund was Seferihisar’s Traditional Cuisine project. With the project, implemented in İzmir’s Seferihisar district globally known for being one of the “Cittaslow”, Seferihisar women will brand the flavors particular to the region. A women’s cooperative runs the ‘Seferihisar’s Traditional Cuisine’ project which is introduced in a meeting held in 4 November. Neptün Soyer, who is the head of Hıdırlık Agricultural Development Cooperative, talks about the project:

Neptün Soyer: Weare 75 women in the Cooperative.We are trying to highlight and value women’s labor. We sell the products that women make in their houses through a website called seferipazar.com, and we deliver to all around Turkey with our partner courier company. Afterwards, we wanted to advance what we have done, in our traditional cuisine and we applied to Future is in Tourism grant call which we came across in a newspaper. Our project was one of three projects selected out of 252 projects and in one year’s time we ran our project with Anadolu Efes, Ministry of Culture, and United Nations Development Programme. There was an old house in a very poor condition, we had it renovated. We have built a kitchen in which women can work and cook comprehensively. With İzmir Economy University who is our partner, our women took courses and trainings. Later we have completed our project after 365 days. Once a week, we give courses. We want visitors coming to Seferihisar to meet our traditional cuisine as well.

Faik Uyanık: Special products, produced by Seferihisar women, are planned to reach consumers online as well as through local Seferihisar bazaars. These products are delivered to all around Turkey through a website called seferipazar.com. Coordinator of the website, Yasemin Karabulut, tells that sales on the website have increased with the support of Future is in Tourism.

Yasemin Karabulut: Actually seferipazar.com operates since three years. Of course with this project, they will continue interdependently. With the project, our sales have increased. Making announcements through Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram has increased our sales. We ship our products all around Turkey.

Faik Uyanık: Fatma Berrin Karabulut, a woman working for the project, tells why she has involved:

Fatma Berrin Karabulut: I have two sons. I started this due to something my son said. When the season came our house smelled sweet ‘tarhana’. When he said “If something happens to you mom, no one will make tarhana in our house, there will no longer be that sweet smell of tarhana.” I thought, yes, we should teach this to others. The new generation has to learn some things that shouldn’t be forgotten. So when this project came up, it was a big plus for us. We have improved ourselves. The trainings were a huge plus for us. Our primary objective is to transmit the forgotten flavors to the next generations.

Faik Uyanık: First term projects granted by Future is in Tourism has come to an end. Fatma tells what they are planning to do after the Seferihisar’s Traditional Cuisine project finishes:

Fatma Berrin Karabulut: Project has come to an end. We are planning to design different projects such as tourism. Visitors will live here, collect herbs with us, and join us while we cook those herbs. We will try to teach the herbs to them. Besides this traditional food, there is the herb culture of Aegean.

Faik Uyanık: We come to the end of this week’s New Horizons with these words from Fatma Berrin Karabulut, a woman from a Future is in Tourism project. In this episode we talked about two successful tourism projects that show us future is in tourism. You can share your thoughts about this episode using #YeniUfuklar hashtag on Twitter.  This program has been recorded at the studio of Radyo İlef of Ankara University Communications Department. You can follow our program on FM frequency in İstanbul, on Açık Radyo (Open Radio) on internet, on university radios in our broadcasting network, on iTunes, Soundcloud, TuneIn, Pure Connect and Audioboo in podcast format, and also and on tr.undp.org. Our user name for social media is undpturkiye. Hope to see you soon, good-bye!

Contributors:

Arzu Kutucu Özenen, Advisor, %100 Misia Project

Nagihan Dülger, Head of Nilufer Misi Village Women’s Cultural and Beneficiary Association, %100 Misia Project

Asiye Kürklü, Founding Member of Nilufer Misi Village Women’s Cultural and Beneficiary Association, %100 Misia Project

Neptün Soyer, Head of Hıdırlık Agricultural Development Cooperative, Seferihisar’s Traditional Cuisine project

Yasemin Karabulut, seferipazar.com Website Coordinator, Seferihisar’s Traditional Cuisine project

Fatma Berrin Karabulut, Seferihisar’s Traditional Cuisine project

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New Horizons

Social Good Summit 2014 İstanbul meetup

Podcast 111

In this episode, we share some parts from Social Good Summit İstanbul meetup held in 23 October.

Faik Uyanık: This is the 111th episode of New Horizons podcast of United Nations Development Programme in Turkey. In this season, we will continue to share development stories from UNDP who works for a more productive, greener and more equal world. In this episode, we will share some parts from Social Good Summit İstanbul meetup held in 23 October. Social Good Summit is a global event organized every year during the UN week in which United Nations Assembly meets and it has been a unique platform for 5 years through which global communities around technology and social media for social change have been connected. This year, Turkey joined global Social Good Summit for the second time, together with more than 70 countries around the world.  From Rwanda to Ukraine, China to Panama, Zimbabwe to Georgia, people had been discussing how new technology, innovation and social media can address the biggest challenges the world will face over the next generation. Social Good Summit invited its participants to imagine the world they want to live in 2030. Therefore the event’s hashtag on social media was #2030NOW. This year Social Good Summit İstanbul meetup was organized by UN Development Programme (UNDP), UN Volunteers (UNV), İstanbul Commerce University and Hürriyet newspaper. Greeting the audience with his opening speech, Kamal Malhotra, UNDP Resident Representative in Turkey, talked about why new technologies are significant to finding solutions for development problems:

Kamal Malhotra: This fast diffusion of new technologies, triggered by the rapid growth of the middle class in developing countries, has created communication channels which give voice to people who had little before. This also establishes new ways of engaging citizens in setting priorities for development. New technologies and new communication channels provide social platforms through which we should meet, talk and galvanize action for social good and find solutions to the most pressing development challenges.

Faik Uyanık:This year, keynote speakers of the meetup were Sinéad McSweeney, Twitter’s Europe, Middle East and Africa Public Policy Director and Raj Kumar, President and Editor-in-Chief of Devex. Sinéad McSweeney talked about examples of using 140 character messages for social good around the world.

Sinead McSweeney: Twitter itself is a platform, it is a tool and it is only as good as the people who use it and the uses to which they put it. In Nigeria for example, a doctor set up an account called Ebola Alert and that has been recognized as having been key to ensuring that Nigeria was able to cope as a country with the Ebola threat. We worked with the World Health Organization at an early stage to help them craft messages and promote those messages and target them where they needed to be targeted. Again very much focused on handling and dealing with misinformation at an early stage and there were some I guess heartening but very sad stories which appeared in the media around that. There was one woman in particular has ultimately survived Ebola but had huge concerns of whether or not she may have infected her family members and some of those tweets from World Health Organization helped reassure her.

Faik Uyanık: Social Good Summit İstanbul meetup continued with Raj Kumar’s speech, President and Editor-in-Chief of Devex, a web portal that international development workers follow closely. Raj Kumar explained new period of development sector and what is waiting for us in the future.

Raj Kumar: We are moving to an era where results will matter much more than ever did before in development and that is going to lead to a far better result ultimately for the people that were all working for around the world. I think especially for the institutions that have been doing this work for a long time in development, it is very easy to see these trends and say well we can see that we sort of agree it is moving this way but we don’t really need to change what we do quickly. But I think it is happening much quicker than we realize. If we are not careful as institutions that already work in this field or as individuals care about this field we will be overtaken by events and overtaken by these trends very quickly. So I think what is coming up on all of us now who work in the development sector, if you are a non-profit or if you are a government aid agency is to really think today what is our strategy for a new world where there ubiquitous internet, ubiquitous technology where there is far more money from many sources, where metrics and results matter much more than they ever did what are we going to do with our non-profit, what are we going to do in our government aid agency or in our institution, small NGO, whatever it is, and how might we shape this new world ourselves? I think it is a very exciting time.

Faik Uyanık: Social Good Summit 2014 İstanbul meetup continued with the panel titled Connecting for Good. Dr. Ali Ercan Özgür from IDEMA was the moderator and he mentioned the need to produce more content for social good.

Ali Ercan Özgür: In brief, both a child, a new-born and this unidentified world of new media that we live in today are both lonely and at the same time social. I mean one of the issues that we need to produce good, is this. That is why I say new world’s baby is new media. 100 million searches monthly are made in this world. It doubles the year before, 15 percent new subjects are searched. But there is a fundamental problem, speaking especially for Turkey: we do not produce enough blog materials and that type of products. There is only 100,000 websites that can be indexed in Turkey. This is why Google Translate does not translate properly. Because there is not enough content. This is why we should produce more for social good, we should take action and we should be activists.

Faik Uyanık: Cherie Hart, Regional Communication Advisor from UNDP’s Regional Office in İstanbul, stated that it does not mean anything if ‘likes’ in social media does not turn into actions.

Cherie Hart: Social media can definitely help raise awareness of an issue. It can build up knowledge and put important matters in front of the right people. But is social media campaign that really has impact, is one makes people take positive action as we have seen today. Facebook likes and twitter followers they are no substitute for real action. And for us, at UNDP the awareness about us is great, it gives knowledge to people who wouldn’t know what we are up to. We want to make sure that people are talking about us for the right reasons and understand some of the impact we have.

Faik Uyanık: Sree Sreenivasan, the first Chief Digital Officer at the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art and New Media Professor at Colombia University, addressed the participants from New York. Sreenivasan gave tips for non-profits using social media and said these platforms are significant because they enable us to reach the target audience.

Sree Sreenivasan: Too many folks think about social media as a broadcasting channel but it is also a listening channel. So you know what is going on, what people are thinking about your service or organization. And it is a great kind of early warning system as well as a way to connect with your audience in deep and meaningful ways.

Faik Uyanık: In the meet-up, which is entirely livestreamed, people all around Turkey shared their opinions and asked questions to the speakers of the meet-up. #2030Şimdi hashtag was used for the discussions on social media during the event.More information about the meet-up can be found on http://bit.ly/socialgoodistanbul. Second panel of the meet up was titled Connecting for All. Pelin Rodoplu from UNDP in Turkey was the moderator of the panel and she talked about UNDP’s efforts on innovation and new media.

Pelin Rodoplu: UNDP is in a repositioning process with its latest strategic plan and it takes serious initiatives to move faster globally and in Turkey, to change our point of view, to increase our mobility, to make better use of new media opportunities and to give a chance to innovations and new thinking tools. An example for that is the SHIFT events held in September, as part of the UN week. SHIFT, let us shift the way we think, the way we move, and let us accelerate. We cannot achieve the change we want by only working with governments or integrating with only certain civil society organizations. We should do it all together, we should do it faster, and we should be flexible enough. This was the event’s motto. From design thinking to using crowd sourcing models… SHIFT meetings held in 22 countries were trying forecasting models in economy and testing empirical approaches. We studied on the ways we can use design thinking in policy making and learned about this new concept. I am sharing the website. You have the opportunity to watch this event that took place in 22 countries in detail, both through UNDP Turkey website and ‘innovation for development’ page, and have the presentations.

Faik Uyanık: Sandrine Ramboux, founder of C@rma, Suat Özçağdaş, founder of Center for Social Innovation, Assist. Prof. Engin Çağlak from İstanbul Commerce University, Tuna Özçuhadar, founder of SürdürülebilirYasam.TV and Sertaç Taşdelen, founder of iyilikpesinde.org, were also among the speakers. In Social Good Summit, Ezgi Başaran from Radikal discussed the realms where online publishing and social good intersect. Suat Özçağdaş, founder of Center for Social İnnovation, explained why young people are so lucky.

Suat Özçağdaş: For the era that we live in, the core thing I can say for the young people is this: you are probably the luckiest young generation of this century, or may be the luckiest that the world history has ever seen, because you have the power to change everything about this world. If you were a university student in 1945 and wanted to spread an idea across the world, it would be quite challenging. But today you can build up a website. If your case is a true one, you can attract people. From Peru, China or Ukraine, you can unite people who share your thoughts. You can reflect what you have organized in cyber to real life.

Faik Uyanık:  With the words of Suat Özçağdaş from Center for social Innovation we come to the end of New Horizons for this week. In this episode, we talked about some parts of Social Good Summit Istanbul meet-up organized for the second time in Turkey on 23 October. You can share your thoughts on the subjects discussed during the Social Good Summit İstanbul Meet-up using #2030now and #YeniUfuklar hashtags on Twitter.  This program has been recorded at the studio of Radyo İlef of Ankara University Communications Department. You can follow our program on FM frequency in İstanbul, on Açık Radyo (Open Radio) on internet, on university radios in our broadcasting network, on iTunes, Soundcloud, TuneIn, Pure Connect and Audioboo in podcast format, and also and on tr.undp.org. Our user name for social media is undpturkiye. Hope to see you soon, good-bye!

Contributors: 

Kamal Malhotra, UN Resident Coordinator and UNDP Resident Representative in Turkey
Sinéad McSweeney, Senior Director, Public Policy, EMEA | Twitter International Company
Raj Kumar, Devex President and Editor-in-chief
Dr. Ali Ercan Özgür, Founder and Managing Director of IDEMA International Development Partners
Cherie Hart, UNDP Regional Communications Advisor
Sree Sreenivasan, Chief Digital Officer at the Metropolitan Museum of Art
Pelin Rodoplu, Regional Competitiveness Specialist at UNDP in Turkey
Suat Özçağdaş Founding Partner at Center for Social Innovation

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New Horizons

South-South Cooperation and Emerging Donor Roles

Podcast 110

In this episode, we talk about a project which aims to strengthen Turkey’s participation to the international development cooperation as an emerging donor country and about a conference which will be organized in Turkey on the subject.

Faik Uyanık: This is the New Horizons podcast of United Nations Development Programme in Turkey. In this episode, we will talk about a project which aims to strengthen Turkey’s participation to the international development cooperation as an emerging donor country and about a conference which will be organized in Turkey on the subject. And our contributor is Ebru Saner, Project Manager of Bridging South-South Cooperation and Emerging Donor Roles project. Welcome!

Ebru Saner: I am glad to be here. Thank you.

Faik Uyanık: Firstly, let’s talk about the Bridging South-South Cooperation and Emerging Donor Roles project. It may not be familiar term for some of our audience. In 2013, the development aid of Turkey for developing countries and least developed countries exceeded 3 billion USD. It was 3.28 billion USD to be exact. It reached to a significant level. In this matter, Turkey stands out as an emerging donor country. The project that you are managing is being implemented on this very subject. The name of the project is ‘Bridging South-South Cooperation and Emerging Donor Roles: Strengthen Turkey’s Participation in International Development Cooperation’. This project is also about the eighth Millennium Development Goal, isn’t it? International development cooperation?

Ebru Saner: Yes, it is about that goal.

Faik Uyanık: How and with which aims did you start this project? What does the South-South Cooperation mean?

Ebru Saner: In order to explain this, I have to go a little back. Our project was started at the beginning of 2009. However, it goes long way back. The first phase of this project started in 1988 when United Nations Development Programme initiated a project in cooperation with State Planning Organization of Turkey. At this time, the main aim was to popularize the South-South Cooperation modality. Regarding the meaning of the project’s name, as we all know, after 1945 the Western countries began to give development aid to developing and least developed countries. On the other hand, starting with the Bandung Conference in 1954, Southern countries began to share their technical capacities with each other and to develop a technical cooperation.

Faik Uyanık: Southern countries mean developing countries…

Ebru Saner: Yes, developing countries.

Faik Uyanık: …and mostly located in the southern globe…

Ebru Saner: South or East. Sometimes it is also called as the East. Actually it is the majority of the world except very rich and developed countries of West and North. Regarding the aim of South-South Cooperation Project, it can be said that the developing countries, who are aware of their problems and develop distinctive solutions, want to share these with other countries. Instead of getting technical cooperation from the countries who have long history of development or from the countries of the West who had a different development history than South and East, those countries want to get technical cooperation from each other and find common solutions for their common problems. As of 1970s, United Nations supports this modality. In Turkey, with the project started in 1988, the ectending process of this modality started. In this regard, Turkish Cooperation and Coordination Agency (TIKA) established in 1992. The main function of TIKA is to coordinate the development aids of Turkish government for developing countries. Our project come to the agenda and started in 2009 as the third phase of the project that started in 1988. The main difference from the previous two phases is that after the successful projects and works on extending this modality of the first two phases, now our project aims to improve the institutional capacity of Turkey’s development aids for developing countries. In this regard, the responsible institution is TIKA – Turkish Cooperation and Coordination Agency. Nowadays, we are developing modalities in order to enhance the technical capacity, expert capacity and quality of TIKA’s aids in accordance with international standards.

Faik Uyanık: Basically, we are talking about a project on Turkey’s foreign aids, coordination of development aids…

Ebru Saner: Yes.

Faik Uyanık: …and thus, we are talking about a project on capacity development in which UNDP is also a partner. At this point, we may briefly mention some concrete works done in this context. What kind of studies done since the early-2009?

Ebru Saner: As I mentioned before, Turkey is one of the few countries that international community already accepts as an emerging donor country. The others are China, India, Brazil and Mexico. Since the mid-2000s, there is a rapid increase on development aid of Turkey. Moreover, OECD Development Assistance Committee distinguished Turkey as a country with the most increase in its development aids. Besides, Turkey ranked four among the countries who give the disaster and emergency aid. Regarding the nature of Turkey’s development aids, in the past it was mostly on technical cooperation and expert exchange whereas now it turned towards important investments on infrastructure. Turkey builds schools, hospitals and roads. The country headed towards programme assistance. It gives support to agricultural programmes. And of course, all those activities require a good strategic planning and programming. Furthermore, Turkey also has a capacity for immediate help and works flexible. Through our project, we are trying both to maintain this speed and flexibility and to ensure that Turkey is giving a strategically planned, programmed development aid by using the experiences that the West and other countries gained on development aids. In order to briefly mention our activities, I can say that we are organizing training programmes in order to strengthen the expert capacity of TIKA and to give support in developing strategies again for TIKA. We are generating strategies for three countries that were selected as pilot countries by TIKA. Those are Bosnia and Herzegovina, Tajikistan and Senegal. We started our work by choosing one pilot country from each continent. Most importantly, we, as UNDP, supported the preparation of Turkey Development Aid Strategy. The important institutions such as Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Ministry of Development, TIKA, Ministry of Health, Ministry of Food, Agriculture and Livestock came together and generated a common strategy in order to implement the policy harmony for Turkey’s development aid. At the same time, we are trying to set the loop of a development aid project that we call as project cycle from beginning to the end. It is because all those development aids have to be monitorable and assessable.

Faik Uyanık: It is obvious that since 2009 lots of capacity development work has been done to support the improvement of development aids of Turkey. Of course, there is more. It was Turkish Cooperation and Coordination Agency, right? The old name was Development Agency. The institution that coordinates the development aids of Turkey. Through the website of UNDP in Turkey, tr.undp.org, you can reach the information regarding this project. Those who want to contribute to this programme can share their opinions from Twitter via #yeniufuklar hashtag. Now we can talk about the conference that will take place in June, the time this podcast will broadcasted. Representatives of other emerging donor countries like Turkey will come together and discuss the trends and opportunities on the subject. What is the importance of this conference? Which themes are going to be covered?

Ebru Saner: As you already mentioned, we are organizing a big international conference in Istanbul on 19-20 June. Some of the guests of the conference are Deputy Prime Minister Emrullah İşler, UNDP Administrator Helen Clark, Turkish Minister of Foreign Affairs Ahmet Davutoğlu. The representatives of emerging donor countries will attend, but we also foresee the participation of representatives of traditional donor countries of the West. At the same time, we will have lots of participants from civil society organizations, academia, think tank etc. Lately, the emerging donor countries change the nature of their development aids. They build up new modalities. All those modalities will be discussed. The questions of “How do emerging donor countries see development aids?”, “How can we go beyond the aid efficiency?”, “How can we increase efficiency?”, “How can we increase the attempts of development partnership with the least developed countries?” will mainly be discussed at this conference. In 2015, Millennium Development Goals are going to be measured and the plans for post-2015 are still going on. The role of those emerging donor countries in the goals of post-2015 will be discussed. Lately, we see that there are private sector companies, charity organizations and some foundations which are funded by private sector are helping to other countries. These aids and their modalities done by foundations and private sector companies are going to be discussed at this conference. Furthermore, the timing of this conference is also very important. On the one hand, it will increase the visibility of Turkey in the field of development aid. On the other hand, global partnership meeting on a ministerial level took place in Mexico on April and Development Partnership Forum will be organized in New York on July. Therefore, this conference is in the middle of these two conferences where we can both discuss the outputs of Mexico meeting and generate opinions for Development Partnership Forum.

Faik Uyanık: In this case, it can be said that the conference is very important both for Millennium Development Goals and for post-2015 global developmental agenda. And, it is also very important that Turkey will host this conference. Moreover, the outputs of this conference will, most probably, be an important input for the subsequent period.

Ebru Saner: Absolutely.

Faik Uyanık: Thank you Ms. Ebru for your contributions.

Ebru Saner: Thank you.

Faik Uyanık: In this episode, we talked about the participation of Turkey to international development partnership as an emerging donor country. Our contributor was Ebru Saner, Project Manager from UNDP Turkey. We come to the end of New Horizons podcasts prepared by UNDP in Turkey. It is also the last podcast of this season. This program has been recorded at the studio of Radyo İlef of Ankara University Communications Department. You can follow our program on iTunes, Soundcloud, TuneIn, Pure Connect and Audioboo in podcast format, on FM frequency in İstanbul, on Açık Radyo (Open Radio) on internet, on nearly fifty Police radios, on MYCY radio from Cyprus and also on university radios in our broadcasting network and on tr.undp.org. Our user name for social media is undpturkiye. Hope to see you soon, good bye!

Contributor:

Ebru Saner, Project Manager of Bridging South-South Cooperation and Emerging Donor Roles project

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New Horizons

International Entrepreneurship Initiative

Podcast 109

In this episode, we talk about the International Entrepreneurship Initiative founded two years ago in Istanbul and what this initiative does.

Faik Uyanık: This is the New Horizons podcasts of United Nations Development Programme in Turkey. In this episode, we will talk about the International Entrepreneurship Initiative founded two years ago in Istanbul and what this initiative does. International Entrepreneurship Initiative organizes idea generation camps about entrepreneurship and entrepreneurship camps which called as Startup Weekend. The initiative also provides training about entrepreneurship. Before going into detail, we will talk about International Entrepreneurship Initiative itself. How was this initiative established? Who are the partners and when did it started functioning? Başak Saral who is the Project Manager from UNDP Turkey and Director of International Entrepreneurship Initiative tells:

Başak Saral: International Entrepreneurship Initiative was established two years ago in collaboration with United Nations Development Programme, TR Ministry of Development, Habitat Center for Development and Governance and Vodafone Turkey Foundation. Although it is established with the initiative of these four institutions, the initiative is constituted and continues its works via gathering of stakeholders from different sectors and institutions that works on entrepreneurship and supports entrepreneurs. Nowadays, it is actually an entrepreneurship network formed by nearly 70 international organizations, civil society organizations, corporations from all around Turkey, but especially Istanbul centered. It is a pilot project located in Turkey for developing innovative solutions, creative ideas and work models in order to generate solutions for social problems and necessities.

Faik Uyanık: International Entrepreneurship Initiative in Istanbul is an international center which is focused and specialized in the field of entrepreneurship. Thus, it organizes lots of events for the promotion of the concept of ‘entrepreneurship’. Idea generation camps are one of those events. In 2014, idea generation camps organized at Istanbul, Eskişehir and İzmir and the Center will continue to organize in other cities. What are these idea generation camps? Başak Saral explains:

Başak Saral: Development of entrepreneurship perception in public is very important for us, as International Entrepreneurship Initiative. Development of the perception about entrepreneurship especially in a positive way and conversion of entrepreneurships into responsible, inclusive, social and green businesses are our main appeals. Idea generation camp is a method applied worldwide by Intel. Intel is a member of Board of Directors of the International Entrepreneurship Initiative. Within our frame of agreement, we are spreading the idea generation camps in Turkey in order to increase the development of innovative ideas and the frequency of idea generation.

Faik Uyanık: How these camps are organized? How many days does it take? What kind of a flow is followed?

Başak Saral: It is a camp that focuses on different social problems and needs with different target groups. It lasts two and half days. At this camp, we are presenting different challenges to the participants as problems with a focus on sustainable development. The participants form a team to solve the need-focused challenges. As a team, they work throughout these two and half days and generate nearly 500 ideas. When they develop their idea, they present it to the jury. This two and half day camp is a very practice-based. At these camps, participants both develop their skills of understanding the problem, generating solutions for the problem, team building and they gain entrepreneurship skills. They also have a chance to meet and present their solutions to entrepreneurs and investors.

Faik Uyanık: In a way, a participant submits her idea to the market and thus, it becomes tested by presenting it to the jury. The Startup Weekend events which can be translated as entrepreneurship camp have the same focus. So far, it has been organized at different places such as Samsun, Antalya and Ankara. What is Startup Weekend? Again, Başak Saral explains:

Başak Saral: Startup Weekend is a method which is supported worldwide under the leadership of Kaufmann Foundation and which is reached more than 40,000 participants in nearly 140 countries. If the Idea Generation Camps are the first phase, we can consider Startup Weekend events as the second phase. In Turkey, we organized Startup Weekend events with support of Microsoft. Microsoft is also a member of our Board of Directors. Here, our participants join with their business ideas and they make a presentation of their business ideas. After the presentation, teams are formed for the seelcted ideas. These teams are composed of both business developers, designers and software developers. So, these teams are formed by entrepreneur candidates with different personalities and abilities. For 48 hours, participants develop their business ideas into prototypes and business models with one-to-one support of mentors and training of educators. These 48 hours conclude with a presentation to the jury where participants meet with investors.

Faik Uyanık: In the context of Startup Weekend events, participants start their work on Friday evening and continue till Sunday evening. During this time, they work on their ideas, bring it into protoype to some extent and then present it to jury. Thus, they are already starting an initiative at that moment. What the participants need to do to participate in Startup Weekend?

Başak Saral: One of our primary targets is to spread the Idea Generation Camps and Startup Weekend events throughout Turkey. Till now, most of these kinds of events were organized in Istanbul. Besides, some similar projects were done in Ankara, Eskişehir and İzmir. However, from the upcoming September on, we are planning to extensively carry out such events in different cities. In this context, we are accessible through social media. People can follow our works and can reach us from these portals.

Faik Uyanık: You can access the website of International Entrepreneurship Initiative from http://www.uluslararasigirisimcilikmerkezi.org and http://ugmistanbul.org. It is also possible to access the social media accounts of the initiative via those websites. Those who want to contribute to this programme can share their opinions from Twitter via #yeniufuklar hashtag. Now, let’s expand the term ‘international’ in the International Entrepreneurship Initiative. To what extent this new-born initiative works at the international level?

Başak Saral: At this pilot stage, the International Entrepreneurship Initiative aimed to gather different institutions in Turkey. Especially Chambers, TOBB Young Entrepreneurs Council and TOBB Women Entrepreneurs Council became such important networks for us to expand. We want to share all these experiences with neighboring countries and with the region in the near future. We consider this as a second stage. We already started to develop the strategy for this stage. The questions we are working on are ‘How can we expand the ecosystem works in Turkey to the region?’ and ‘In what ways can we give support to the works and ideas in the region in order to bring them together with investors, like we do in Turkey?’ I think, from the next year on, we will be able to proceed to this phase.

Faik Uyanık: As we mentioned before, International Entrepreneurship Initiative organizes trainings about enterpreneurship. Başak Saral talks about these trainings:

Başak Saral: Actually, Idea Generation Camps and Startup Weekends are also a sort of entrepreneurship trainings. These are education programs which improve the perception and the abilities of the youth, women and other groups who want to be an entrepreneur. However, with these trainings we want to support not only the ones who want to be an entrepreneur, but also the ones who already initiated their enterprise. In this context, we examined the applied trainings in every part of Turkey and came up with an education kit. In the framework of this kit, we organized training of trainers for entrepreneurs and academicians. Moreover, we are extensively communicating these trainings to the ones who are already entrepreneurs and who need to develop their management skills although they know their product and services. We will make this education kit for sustainable entrepreneurship accessible to everyone who contacts us and want to benefit from this kit. If you want to benefit from this kit, you can contact us.

Faik Uyanık: Will this kit be also accessible via your website?

Başak Saral: As we are at the last editing stage, it is not accessible now. However, it will be on the website in forthcoming period. As I already expressed, because of our nature, we have a chance to work with different institutions and experts. Moreover, we are also supporting the expertise that communicates these training processes in different cities in a modular way. These trainings are about different subjects ranging from the risk management to the importance and contributions of technology and different fields that are important for an entrepreneur. In this way, it turns into a new network of expanding expertise.

Faik Uyanık: Where are these trainings organized?

Başak Saral: Primarily, we defined seven provinces from seven geographic regions. These seven provinces are İstanbul, İzmir, Eskişehir, Antalya, Samsun, Adıyaman and Erzurum. At first, we want to pilot and experience it at these provinces. However, this is not a kind of a project that will remain limited with these provinces. We already started to expand the implemented works to other provinces.

Faik Uyanık: Are all those trainings and activities free?

Başak Saral: For now, these trainings and activities are for free. You can think of this as a social responsibility work which supports social development and many different institutions took responsibility in this.

Faik Uyanık: With these words of Başak Saral, Project Manager from UNDP Turkey and Director of International Entrepreneurship Initiative, we came to the end of New Horizons for this week. In this episode, we talked about the International Entrepreneurship Initiative founded two years ago in Istanbul and what this initiative does. This programme has been prepared by United Nations Development Programme in Turkey and has been recorded at the studio of Radyo İlef of Ankara University Communications Department. You can follow our program on iTunes, Soundcloud, TuneIn, Pure Connect and Audioboo in podcast format, on FM frequency in İstanbul, on Açık Radyo (Open Radio) on internet, on nearly fifty Police radios, on MYCY radio from Cyprus and also on university radios in our broadcasting network and on tr.undp.org. Our user name for social media is undpturkiye. Hope to see you soon, good bye!

Contributor:

Başak Saral, Project Manager from UNDP Turkey and Director of International Entrepreneurship Initiative

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New Horizons

International Summit of High Courts: İstanbul Declaration

Podcast 108

In this episode, we talk about a summit which is organized in İstanbul and where knowledge and experiences about judicial process of high courts worldwide are shared.

Faik Uyanık: This is the New Horizons podcasts of United Nations Development Programme in Turkey. In this episode, we will talk about a summit which is organized in İstanbul and where knowledge and experiences about judicial process of high courts worldwide are shared. This summit is called International Summit of High Courts and our contributor is Dr. Leyla Şen who is UNDP Democratic Governance Programme Manager. Welcome.

Leyla Şen: Thank you.

Faik Uyanık: Thank you very much for coming.First International Summit of High Courts was organized in İstanbul in 2010. Let us give some background information. Second International Summit of High Courts is also organized in İstanbul in Çırağan Palace in November 2013. It has been a long time. The Summit brought thirteen justices and chief justices of the Asian countries, and senior UN officials together. We can talk about this a bit later. We will talk about the results too. But first of all, if you wish, we can talk about the theme of this summit which is judicial transparency. What do we understand from judicial transparency and what does UNDP do in this field?

Leyla Şen: First of all, thank you very much for giving us this opportunity. Judicial transparency, just like judicial independence, is one of the basic touchstones. As each individual’s rights and obligations are identified in Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the Declaration also identifies that everyone is entitled to a fair and public hearing by an independent and impartial tribunal, in the determination of rights and obligations and of any criminal charge. When you look at it, judicial transparency is a process which includes physical access, access to information, open courts, appointments, removal of a judge from his/her office, sharing the judgment with public, access to justice and also media pillar in it. What we mean by physical access is: Court premises should be located in a way that people can access them easily and jurists can exercise their duties easily. This is very very important. For instance, if you are a person with disability and if you compensate from your rights just because court premises are too far from you, this is an important problem. The other issue is appointments. Appointments of judges should be done with certain rules, out of sorts and objective. Dismissals should also be done by councils which we call top management of judiciary. The reasons of these dismissals should be shared with the public and there should not be any doubts. Courts working openly and rights based. This is very important. When a court runs a trial, there should not be any thoughts or doubts in people’s minds about courts being partial or gathered to approve a decision on paper which is obviously approved before. We call this open court. Media is one of the most important pillars in access to justice as media is the channel that public can be informed about judicial processes within the transparency criteria. Independent, conscientious and objective media. And of course media should be supported about access to courts. Access to courts is not only about letting media members in the court rooms or providing them the information, it is also about training the media members about these processes, about informing the public objectively, impartially and without affecting the result and also hold media members responsible with this obligation.

Faik Uyanık: In fact, although judicial transparency is two words, it is an important theme which gets its basis from Universal Declaration of Human Rights and has references from many international documents about human rights.

Leyla Şen: Exactly.

Faik Uyanık: It stays at the center of justice. That is what we understand from your definition. We can look further into this. Now, it is also important that Turkey hosted the Summit of High Courts. First summit organized in 2010. The second one was in 2013. What was the importance of this Summit? The theme was judicial transparency. Which specific topics were covered in the Second Summit of High Courts?

Leyla Şen: The High Summits that we are talking about have always been gathered around themes. We have especially chosen judicial transparency in the second one. The reason for this is as the name implies ‘High Courts’. What we have seen from our studies is that there was not a binding and recognized declaration on judicial transparency for high judicial bodies. For instance, when we look at Bangalore Principles of Judicial Conduct, this is recognized by whole judicial system. There is an agreement to implement these principles.

Faik Uyanık: What are these principles?

Leyla Şen: Banglore Principles of Judicial Conduct when they perform their duties on stand or out of stand.

Faik Uyanık: When jurists perform?

Leyla Şen: How jurists should perform. As such a declaration was missing, we marked a first. Actually we did not, as the United Nations. We only facilitated the process. A declaration was endorsed at the end of this Summit. Thirteen chief justices and justices in Asia endorsed and accepted this Declaration. There is a process of adoption now in the UN system. We presented this declaration to UN Special Rapporteur on Independence of Judges and Lawyers and it is included in the first report. Hence we started the process to make Istanbul Declaration on Judicial Transparency a reference document like Bangalore Principles and to make it known in the international community.

Faik Uyanık: This is important. Istanbul Declaration which is the first set of principles on judicial transparency endorsed and accepted by the participants. Which themes or sub-topics were focused in the İstanbul Declaration on judicial transparency? And in your opinion, what kind of innovation did this declaration bring at the international level?

Leyla Şen: This is my favorite expression: There is nothing new that can be said in this world. But we can present what has already been said in a well coordinated and logical framework. This lack of declaration on the subject was actually lack of presenting what has already been said in a neat and systematic way, more than an innovation. It consists of 15 principles and these principles are basic ones on judicial transparency. To name a few, these principles are “judicial proceedings must, as a general rule, be conducted in public”, “the judicial system should ensure easy access to court premises and to information”, “the judiciary should facilitate access to the judicial system”, “the judiciary should provide translation and interpretation facilities to court users free of charge”, “the judiciary should ensure transparency in the delivery of justice”, “the judiciary should have supervisory powers over executive detention”, “the judiciary should ensure that judicial decisions of the superior/appellate courts are regularly published and the judiciary should respond to complaints of unethical conduct of judges in a transparent manner”.

Faik Uyanık: In this way, 15 universal principles were brought together in a declaration. It is possible to access to this declaration via our website. When you enter tr.undp.org, or when you enter the website of the Summit of High Courts, you can access to the related documents. Those who would like to join our discussion can do so via Twitter with #yeniufuklar hashtag. We have talked about the İstanbul Declaration which consists of 15 important principles. Of course there are general acceptances, as this a declaration of principles. How is this going to be carried into effect? What kind of a process will this declaration go through?

Leyla Şen: Now, as I said, this is a declaration that gathered these principles in a neat and systematic way which are already adopted and realized by jurists from different references. This is about systemizing what are already being implemented, being adopted by the system and this is a way to make people or jurists see that these principles are part of a system. I am sure that chief justices, who signed the İstanbul Declaration, have already been taking steps to realize these principles. We started the international process at the high councils of the UN in order to make this declaration adopted by the international community apart from the thirteen chief justices that we hosted at the Summit. This will take some time but I believe, as this fills a gap, the declaration will be adopted relatively in a short time. As I said, you can be very sensitive to judicial transparency and you work for implementing the judicial transparency principles in your system. But I might be your colleague and I might not be that sensitive. This should not be bound to personal decisions. Of course, judicial transparency is not something only judiciary can set. The state should establish, identify and realize mechanisms that can provide judicial transparency as well as judicial independency. Judiciary should definitely be independent from legislative and executive powers and should serve objectively and fairly.

Faik Uyanık: Of course, these kinds of declarations present the general principles and the rest should be implemented by the countries within their own systems.

Leyla Şen: Exactly.

Faik Uyanık: Now, we should mention about an important process that resulted this declaration. Lastly, we can talk about this. Because this is a result of an important project in which UNDP partners with Turkey. International Summit of High Courts was organized within the context of the partnership between Court of Cassation of Turkey and UNDP Turkey. Court of Cassation of Turkey and UNDP Turkey has a strong partnership since 2009 with the aim of improving the institutional and administrative capacity of the high courts in Turkey to conform to the international standards. This is a strong partnership. This project started in 2012. Its name is a bit long: “Support to the Institutional Administration of the Presidency of the Court of Cassation in line with the International Standards”. This is a continuation of this partnership. Now, what was the importance of this Summit for the project? Can you briefly summarize the latest situation in the project?

Leyla Şen: In the project world, we always dream of getting lasting results because if you are especially working for projects in the international community, you do not implement projects just for the sake of implementing them. It is expected that these projects should support governments in providing people decent livelihood conditions, increasing quality of life and should touch the daily lives of people. In this respect, this project was important. This is not an outcome that was only about Turkey. As I said, this is a declaration which is endorsed by chief justices of thirteen countries. This is a set of principles. I think and believe that these principles are more carefully evaluated in these countries now. And in the next step, if this declaration is adopted at the United Nations level, other regional entities will also be able to adopt it and give references to it and can work to integrate states’ systems. Hence, it was a project implemented modestly but it was a study which other states can also give references to for their legal systems.

Faik Uyanık: Thank you very much, Leyla Şen for joining our programme.

Leyla Şen: Thank you.

Faik Uyanık: In this episode, we talked about İstanbul Declaration which was about judicial transparency and which was endorsed in November 2013. And our contributor was Dr. Leyla Şen, UNDP Democratic Governance Programme Manager. We come to the end of New Horizons podcast prepared by UNDP in Turkey. This program has been recorded at the studio of Radyo İlef of Ankara University Communications Department. You can follow our program on iTunes, Soundcloud, TuneIn, Pure Connect and Audioboo in podcast format, on FM frequency in İstanbul, on Açık Radyo (Open Radio) on internet, on nearly fifty Police radios, on MYCY radio from Cyprus and also on university radios in our broadcasting network and on tr.undp.org. Our user name for social media is undpturkiye. Hope to see you soon, good bye!

Contributor:

Dr. Leyla Şen, UNDP Democratic Governance Programme Manager

Standart
New Horizons

Sustainable energy solutions and the role of private sector

Podcast 107

In this episode, we talk about a regional conference where sustainable energy solutions in Europe and Central Asia and the role of private sector in these solutions will be discussed.

Faik Uyanık: This is the New Horizons podcasts of United Nations Development Programme in Turkey. In this episode, we will talk about a regional conference where sustainable energy solutions in Europe and Central Asia and the role of private sector in these solutions will be discussed. This conference will be organized on 13-14 May in Istanbul. And our contributor is Deniz Tapan from UNDP. Welcome!

Deniz Tapan: Thank you.

Faik Uyanık: Deniz Tapan is the Communication Specialist at Environment and Sustainable Development Programme of UNDP in Turkey. Before talking about the conference, I want to drop some notes, Ms. Deniz Tapan. There are still 1.3 billion people, corresponds to one out of five people in the world, who lacks the necessary electricity to light up their house and workplace. That’s why sustainable energy for all is very important. As it has that much of importance, UNDP wants to discuss the role of private sector in developing solutions for sustainable development in Europe and Central Asia with a regional conference. The Ministry of Energy and Natural Resources of the Republic of Turkey collaborated with Islamic Development Bank in order to organize the conference. In 2011, United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon started an initiative. It was Sustainable Energy for All which, in a bit, we will ask you to explain. This conference is also one of the works that will be done in accordance with this initiative. First of all, can you please speak about the Sustainable Energy for All initiative of the UN Secretary-General?

Deniz Tapan: UN Secretary-General launched this initiative with stressing out two important points. First was access to energy. As you mentioned at the beginning, one out of five people in the world have difficulties accessing energy. The second point was that, at the countries where there is an access to energy, we are facing the problem of carbon emission and other greenhouse gases as a result of fossil fuel usage. This increases the effects of climate change on people and on businesses. On the basis of all those, he started this initiative in order to achieve a cleaner and more effective energy and to involve all partners, ranging from private sector, to governments and business in sustainable energy solutions. While in search of this quest, the UN Secretary-General launched this initiative that can attract governments, business world and everyone to sustainable energy solutions. At this stage, three basic and interrelated targets to achieve till 2030 were determined.

Faik Uyanık: So, then we have three main objectives which we are hoping to achieve till 2030 in the context of Sustainable Energy for All, right?

Deniz Tapan: Yes. Let me briefly mention all those objectives. The first one is to ensure universal access to modern energy services. Second main objective is to double the global rate of improvement in energy efficiency. And thirdly, there is doubling the share of renewable energy in global energy mix. In brief, when we say sustainable energy, it basically means efficient use of energy, moving towards sustainable energy sources and access to energy.

Faik Uyanık: As we stated at the beginning, one of every five person has no access to energy. In that case, we can say that the Sustainable Energy for All initiative stresses the importance of primarily, access to modern energy services for those people and later, as you said, there comes renewable energy and energy efficiency. Going back to the conference, let’s talk a bit about the relationship between the conference in Istanbul and the Sustainable Energy for All initiative. How may the Istanbul regional conference contribute to this initiative?

Deniz Tapan: The Regional Conference is jointly organized by Islamic Development Bank and the United Nations Development Programme and hosted by the Government of Turkey, Ministry of Energy and Natural Resources. During the conference, the role of private sector in the sustainable energy solutions will be discussed. This conference takes place in the context of the organizers’ commitments to expand Sustainable Energy for All Initiative. In this sense, the conference directly supports this initiative.

Faik Uyanık: It becomes obvious that Sustainable Energy for All initiative brings together many themes under its subject and in that case, the theme of private sector involvement will be discussed in Istanbul. There may be some audiences who want to get detailed information regarding the conference. If you visit the UNDP in Turkey website, you will see a link for website dedicated to this conference. Through tr.undp.org, you can obtain the information regarding the sustainable energy conference. Those who want to contribute to this program can share their opinions from Twitter via #yeniufuklar hashtag. We now continue our conversation with Deniz Tapan from UNDP. The conference that we talked about will host notable leaders of business world as well as finance institutions, governments and representatives of international organizations from Europe and Central Asia. Which themes are going to be covered?

Deniz Tapan: As the conference is focused on the private sector, primarily it will be about establishing and developing public-private partnerships. At the same time, lots of partners from different sectors will also participate to the conference. We expect participants from wide range of institutions such as international organizations, finance institutions, representatives of private sector, energy efficiency consulting firms etc. The inclusion of private sector to the solutions for sustainable energy and development of investments regarding this will be shared. Besides, the successful examples which performed till today inside the region that conference concentrated on, Europe and Commonwealth of Independent States region will be presented. Those examples include the samples on energy efficiency, sustainable energy or any other example that refers to sustainable energy.

Faik Uyanık: As you said, the conference in Istanbul will host many people coming from the region of Europe and Central Asia countries. However, the conference has a special importance for the host government, Turkey. It is because in this conference, Turkey, in a sense, will announce its support for the Sustainable Energy for All initiative. In the region of Europe and Central Asia, there are six countries including Turkey who declared their support to this initiative. What is the importance of this commitment for Turkey?

Deniz Tapan: In fact Turkey announced its commitment to support this initiative on January 2014. Turkey accelerate its works on sustainable energy in recent years. There are many improvements on renewable energy and energy efficiency policies and also on the incentives about these subjects. In this regard, we as UNDP are implementing some projects in partnership with General Directorate of Renewable Energy of Ministry of Energy and Natural Resources. We have three projects on energy efficiency. One of them is the development of energy efficiency in industry in Turkey. Another one is development of energy efficiency in buildings. And the last one is about market transformation of energy efficient appliances. It includes household electrical appliances such as refrigerator, washing machine, television etc. Apart from those, there are projects for sustainable energy and energy efficiency in GAP region in collaboration with GAP Regional Development Administration. Besides, there is an energy efficiency strategy and action plan that Turkey already prepared. Moreover, Turkey conducts works related to sustainable energy and there are also some projects that will support this initiative of Turkey on the level of policy and legislation.

Faik Uyanık: Yes, lots of United Nations institutions support this initiative of UN Secretary-General from different dimensions. The theme that UNDP involved as you already said, is establishing good practices via establishing partnerships with governments on energy efficiency, renewable energy and energy types. As we said, we are talking about a global effort when we say Sustainable Energy for All and the conference in Istanbul is also a part of this global effort. Lastly, I want to ask what kind of results are you expecting to get at the end of the conference and how these results will contribute to these efforts.

Deniz Tapan: It has been expected to establish and develop new and concrete public-private sector partnerships and investment opportunities at the end of the conference. Of course, it was aimed that again, all those partnerships and opportunities should focus on sustainable energy solutions. Moreover, another expected result is some concrete results, opportunities and experiences that will encourage the private sector to invest in solutions for sustainable energy. The conference is also very important in the sense that it can be a platform for lots of institutions such as public institutions, finance institutions, business world where they can discuss on their action plans towards future. Another important expected result is the presentation of very effective opportunities on sustainable energy.

Faik Uyanık: Thank you Ms. Deniz Tapan. In this episode, we talked about a regional conference in Istanbul where sustainable energy solutions in Europe and Central Asia and the role of private sector in these solutions will be discussed. Our contributor was Deniz Tapan, Communication Specialist at Environment and Sustainable Development Program of UNDP in Turkey. We come to the end of New Horizons podcast prepared by UNDP in Turkey. This program has been recorded at the studio of Radyo İlef of Ankara University Communications Department. You can follow our program on iTunes, Soundcloud, TuneIn, Pure Connect and Audioboo in podcast format, on FM frequency in İstanbul, on Açık Radyo (Open Radio) on internet, on nearly fifty Police radios, on MYCY radio from Cyprus and also on university radios in our broadcasting network and on tr.undp.org. Our user name for social media is undpturkiye. Hope to see you soon, good bye!

Contributor:

Deniz Tapan, Communications Expert at Environment and Sustainable Development Programme in UNDP Turkey

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