New Horizons

UN İstanbul Regional Hub

Podcast 134

In this episode, we talk about new Istanbul Regional Hub, inaugurated in April.

Faik Uyanık: This is the New Horizons Podcasts prepared by United Nations Development Programme in Turkey. In this episode, we talk about new Istanbul Regional Hub, inaugurated in April. The United Nations and the Republic of Turkey on 23 April officially launched the new Istanbul Regional. The Hub also hosts UNICEF and UN Women regional offices. Helen Clark, UNDP Administrator, delivered a speech at the inauguration ceremony and said that a dream has come true:

Helen Clark: I think for so many of us today is a dream come through to have modern office here for regional activities of UNDP in İstanbul. We have had so many very productive conversations over several years now with a very very strong supporters and the Government of Turkey and the city of İstanbul. And you see throughout strongest supporters sitting here today, without whom it would be impossible. And you have always been so welcoming of us coming to a city which is no one else where East meets West and the vision for İstanbul has been to use its convening power of centuries in time to bring people together. And here in UNDP, we aim to bring people together for human progress.

Faik Uyanık: Helen Clark, UNDP Administrator. Helen Clark was joined by Mr. Mevlüt Çavuşoğlu, Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Turkey, and Mr. Kadir Topbaş, Mayor of the Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality, to inaugurate the new Hub and unveil a plaque on the premises in Key Plaza in Istanbul. Mevlüt Çavuşoğlu, delivering a speech at the ceremony, talked about why this Regional Hub is important for them:

Mevlüt Çavuşoğlu: There are different meanings for us to have this hub here in Turkey, in İstanbul. Above all, this is a reflection of our multi-dimensional and active foreign policy. One of the important elements of this multi-dimensional and active foreign policy is to support international and regional organizations and play an active role in these organizations. Today, Turkey is co-chairing many important UN initiatives, along with its role in the UN. Turkey is the co-chair, together with Spain, of the Alliance of Civilizations. Likewise, Turkey is the co-chair of Peace Mediation Initiative, together with Finland. On the other side, Turkey is also the co-chair, together with the USA, of Global Counterterrorism Forum.

Faik Uyanık: Mevlüt Çavuşoğlu, Minister of Foreign Affairs. The result of a strategic partnership, the new Hub recognizes the increasing role and engagement of Turkey and emerging economies in the region in shaping and contributing to global development issues. The Hub operates within a framework that will help deliver quality, accessible and locally relevant services to the 22 countries and territories in which UNDP works in Europe and CIS. Kadir Topbaş, Mayor of the İstanbul Metropolitan Municipality, stated that the inauguration of İstanbul Regional Hub is a historic moment for İstanbul and underlined the importance of Hub for İstanbul:

Kadir Topbaş: We, as the İstanbul Metropolitan Municipality, always tried to express that UN Offices can be located in İstanbul due to its geographic location, history and its importance in the region. We wanted İstanbul to be like a UN island. Today, here, we see this inauguration ceremony of İstanbul Regional Hub as the reflection of our intentions and wishes and, seeing the result, I would like to express my appreciation.

Faik Uyanık: Developing and transition economies of Europe and Central Asia are showing  poverty and inequality, even in some upper middle-income countries, as well as declining life expectancy relative to global averages in many countries, according to analysis in Poverty, Inequality and Vulnerability in the Transition and Developing Economies of Europe and Central Asia, recently released by UNDP. A changing climate and rapidly growing exposure to disaster risk also present the region with new and evolving challenges. The support of the Istanbul Regional Hub will enable countries to pursue development paths that are responsive to these and other issues, including sustainable growth, governance and peace-building, gender equality and women’s empowerment, energy, disaster resilience and climate change, and the protection of children’s rights. Helen Clark, UNDP Administrator:

Helen Clark: At this time, we already have more than 135 people in the hub from UNDP and from UN Women as well, a sister organization. And our people here are providing policy and programme support across everything UNDP does. All the policy areas across sustainable development, disaster risk reduction, climate change, rule of law, governance you name it, and we are well positioned to support our country offices and partner governments right through the European and Central Asia region.

Faik Uyanık: Helen Clark, UNDP Administrator.The Istanbul Regional Hub and the Republic of Turkey will jointly advance efforts to promote south-south cooperation and share Turkey’s important development experience with other countries. This strategic partnership recognizes the increasing role of Turkey as an emerging donor for development cooperation across the world. Helen Clark talked about the strategic partnership between UNDP and Turkey during her speech:

Helen Clark: We have really a unique relationship with Turkey which sees it active and supporting our affairs at every level, the country level where the programme of Turkey is growing, at this regional level where our move here has been facilitated by the Government but also the Government is backing an ongoing contribution to our regional programme. We have the support for the Global Policy Center on the private sector and development here in İstanbul. And of course Turkey has also become a core funding partner for UNDP and as well as very involved with us in dialogue and the convening around the big issues in global development. And we estimate that this regional hub already since it opens its doors to start work last year has organized and hosted more than twelve regional and global UN events. And that is really just the beginning. So, we are confident Mr. Minister, Mr. Mayor that with the strong support of the Government of Turkey and the dedication of all our colleagues who you see here, this İstanbul Regional Hub will be recognized as a Center of Excellence and Development and as a very important partner to countries throughout the region and beyond.

Faik Uyanık: Helen Clark, UNDP Administrator. Mevlüt Çavuşoğlu, Minister of Foreign Affairs, says that the partnership between Turkey and UNDP will strongly continue and adds the following:

Mevlüt Çavuşoğlu: İstanbul is now the second city in the world after New York, in terms of locating the most diplomatic missions and offices. In other words, it is not in competition with Ankara. İstanbul is the second city in the world after New York where there are 184 offices for foreign representations and international organizations. UNDP opening a regional hub here in İstanbul, Turkey is actually a strong indicator and also complementary with our idea of supporting and giving such importance to development projects and programmes. We, both as the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and İstanbul Metropolitan Municipality, have been giving logistical support to the Hub, and we will continue to do so. In addition, we will continue to give financial support in order to support the success of this Hub we are inaugurating today. We will voluntarily contribute 3 million dollars every year during the next five years in order to support the kick-off of the projects apart from other contributions we have made. In other words, we will contribute 15 million dollars to UNDP, voluntarily.

Faik Uyanık: We have come to the end of New Horizons prepared by UNDP in Turkey this week with the words of Mevlüt Çavuşoğlu, the Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Turkey. In this episode, we talk about new Istanbul Regional Hub, inaugurated in April. This program has been recorded at the studio of Radyo İlef of Ankara University Communications Department. You can follow our program on FM frequency in İstanbul, on Açık Radyo (Open Radio) on Internet, on university radios in our broadcasting network, on iTunes, Soundcloud, TuneIn, Pure Connect, Yodiviki, Audioboo and TTNET Müzik in podcast format, and also on tr.undp.org. Our user name for social media is undpturkiye. Hope to see you soon, good-bye!

Contributors:

Mevlüt Çavuşoğlu, Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Turkey

Helen Clark, UNDP Administrator

Kadir Topbaş, Mayor of the Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality

Reklamlar
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New Horizons

GAP Energy Efficiency Incubation Center

Podcast 133

In this episode, we will talk about GAP Energy Efficiency Incubation Center which was established in April in Gaziantep.

Faik Uyanık: This is the New Horizons Podcasts prepared by United Nations Development Programme in Turkey. In this episode, we will talk about GAP Energy Efficiency Incubation Center which was established in April in Gaziantep. Energy Efficiency Incubation Center, which is established to improve the energy efficiency sustainably in Southeast Anatolia Region, was inaugurated by Cevdet Yılmaz, Minister of Development of the Republic of Turkey and Helen Clark, UNDP Administrator. The ceremony was hosted by President of Southeast Anatolia Project Regional Development Administration (GAP RDA). The incubation center is established within the framework of “Utilization of Renewable Energy Resources and Increasing Energy Efficiency in Southeast Anatolia Region” project. Project is being implemented by the Southeast Anatolia Regional Development Administration of Turkish Ministry of Development (GAP RDA), with the technical support of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP). Establishment of an Energy Efficiency Incubation Center, which will be used by the Energy Efficiency Audit Companies, is one of the key project activities and it is established with the cooperation of Gaziantep Chamber of Industry and Gaziantep University. Helen Clark, UNDP Administrator, made a speech at the opening ceremony on 22 April and talked about the cooperation of UNDP with its stakeholders in Southeast Anatolia Region:

Helen Clark: UNDP has been working with partners in this part of Turkey for more than 15 years, and we have valued the very strong partnership with the Southeast Anatolia Regional Development Administration, GAP, since the mid-1990s. It has been one of the key partnerships in Turkey. We share the vision of the Competitiveness Agenda, which has been developed for the region, that vision for transforming part of the region known as the Fertile Crescent, or the Cradle of Civilization, into a Cradle of Sustainable Civilizations. Over the years, we have been part of a number of projects and support of the competitiveness agenda. So, together with the Southeast Anatolia Project Regional Development Administration and other partners, we have been pleased to be a part of promoting organic agriculture and rural competitiveness, capitalizing on the fertile land of the region. We have also been a part of showcasing how “greening” the local economy by tapping into the energy from the sun can help boost competitiveness, and we are supporting now the use of more renewable energy across all sectors, following the adoption in the region of its first-ever regional energy efficiency and renewable energy strategy and action plan in recent years. We have also been jointly supporting women’s economic empowerment, by promoting locally produced, traditional fabrics at the national markets.

Faik Uyanık: We listened to Helen Clark, UNDP Administrator. In her speech, Ms. Clark highlighted that she considers GAP Energy Efficient Incubation Center as a part of significant efforts made to support sustainable and inclusive development in the region. Cevdet Yılmaz, Minister of Development, also made a speech at the opening ceremony, underlined that energy efficiency is one of 25 critical areas identified in the tenth 5 year Development Plan and explained why the Center was established:

Cevdet Yılmaz: We give such an importance to energy efficiency and renewable energy in the GAP region. In the upcoming period, as we pay attention to renewable energy in the upcoming action plan, we want GAP region to be examplary as well in terms of energy efficiency. In this scope, Second Phase of Energy Efficiency project, whose first phase started in 2009 by GAP Regional Development Administration, kicked off in 2012 and it continues this year. We expect here to increase energy efficiency especially in industry and buildings. In this respect, Gaziantep again is a significant city; it is a city where industry is intensively situated. With the realization of these energy efficiency projects especially in Gaziantep, both the competitiveness of our industries will increase and we will pollute the environment less and we will decrease foreign dependency[on energy]. However, for all these to happen, improvement of energy efficiency audit companies at the local level are significant. That is why this Incubator is so valuable. Thanks to this Incubator, we both expect the improvement  of energy efficiency audit companies at the local level and to come up with important benefits for all industry.

Faik Uyanık: Cevdet Yılmaz, Minister of Development. The Energy Efficiency Incubation Center will contain technical and modern testing and measurement equipment and laboratory which are necessary for conducting energy efficiency audits in the industry and building sectors. Helen Clark talked about the features of the Incubation Center:

Helen Clark: This Incubation Centre’s business model and its services are absolutely designed so that they are in line with the local needs and local realities and a fully owned by the main local stakeholders: the Chamber of Industry and the University. The Centre will be providing technical capacity for energy efficiency consultancy services and audits and so will be contributing to making the region’s industries more energy efficient.

Faik Uyanık: Helen Clark, UNDP Administrator. The building of the center which is provided by Gaziantep Chamber of Industry is designed and renovated according to the German Passive House Institute’s EnerPHit criteria. The Energy Efficiency Incubation Center building will be the first and the only renovated energy efficient building to have the EnerPHit certification in Turkey. Passive House is an internationally recognized energy efficient building standard provided by German Passive House Institute. Passive Houses make efficient use of the sun, internal heat sources and heat recovery, rendering conventional heating systems unnecessary throughout even the coldest of winters. Cevdet Yılmaz, Minister of Development:

Cevdet Yılmaz: In the building, especially in this building, we expect a 74 percent of energy saving on annual basis. I thank everyone for their efforts in this pilot project. On this opportunity, I want to reemphasize that these projects are significant in all respects.

Faik Uyanık: We listen to Cevdet Yılmaz, Minister of Development. Helen Clark, UNDP Administrator, in her speech also emphasized that this center is a sample and thanked all stakeholders for their contributions:

Helen Clark: This is a great example to me of how UNDP can support partners which want to move towards greener and sustainable growth. And we will be sharing experiences of being a part of this project of the Energy Efficiency Incubator with other areas of not only this country but in other regions in which we work and other countries in which we work. I would like to thank all the partners who have been so closed to us on this project and indeed in this region of Turkey; the Chamber of Industry, the University, many other local partners, and of course the engineers who have made this Centre possible. And we thank the Southeast Anatolia Project Regional Development Administration for the longstanding partnership with you, and wish you well as you continue to implement the regional development action plan. I believe that the path to a better future for all of us – one where people have better life prospects, higher incomes, both sustainable economy and environment always begins with thinking and acting locally. And here in Gaziantep, we see you walking along that path acting locally also thinking globally.

Faik Uyanık: We have come to the end of New Horizons prepared by UNDP in Turkey this week with the words of Helen Clark, United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Administrator. In this episode, we talked about GAP Energy Efficiency Incubation Center, which was established in April in Gaziantep. This program has been recorded at the studio of Radyo İlef of Ankara University Communications Department. You can follow our program on FM frequency in İstanbul, on Açık Radyo (Open Radio) on Internet, on university radios in our broadcasting network, on iTunes, Soundcloud, TuneIn, Pure Connect, Yodiviki and Audioboo in podcast format, and also on tr.undp.org. Our user name for social media is undpturkiye. Hope to see you soon, good-bye!

Contributors:

Cevdet Yılmaz, Minister of Development

Helen Clark, UNDP Administrator

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New Horizons

Why is Disaster Risk Reduction Important for Sustainable Development?

Podcast 127

In this episode, we talk about disaster risk reduction which the international community will significantly focus on in 2015 and which is one of the most important necessities for sustainable development.

Faik Uyanık: This is the New Horizons Podcasts prepared by United Nations Development Programme in Turkey. In this episode, we talk about disaster risk reduction which the international community will significantly focus on in 2015 and which is one of the most important necessities for sustainable development. This week, an important conference on disaster risk reduction will be held in Sendai, Japan. Disaster risk reduction and taking necessary steps are significant because in the last 20 years, more than 1,3 million people died and more than 4 billion lives are affected all over the world. It cost nearly 2 trillion dollars. Unless precautions are taken against disasters, eradicating global poverty and sustainable development will be impossible. Rastislav Vrbensky, the Manager of UNDP Regional Hub explains disaster risk reduction:

Rastislav Vrbensky: We all know, we all understand, we all experience different kinds of disasters. Earthquake… You, your country has experienced devastating earthquakes couple of times. We all experience floods, we all experience droughts, we all experience different kinds of disasters. We can divide them into two categories; one is ‘natural disasters’ which we can hardly control and then the second one is manmade, man actually human beings and humanity through its activities conscious or unconscious are contributing to disasters.We all know that investment into preparedness for disaster is much better investment than investment into recovery. There are different studies done which basically showed that investment into preparedness is 1 to 10, 1 to 20 times wiser. In otherwise, if you are not investing 1 dollar in preparedness, you may invest 10, 20, 30 dollars in recovery.

Faik Uyanık: Well, why is disaster risk reduction is important for sustainable development and human development? Rastislav Vrbensky:

Rastislav Vrbensky: We believe in UNDP… we are developmental organization. So, we are helping countries to develop faster but we are increasingly understanding that unless we are going to be able to deal with disturbing factors like conflict, like disaster, we are not going to be able to achieve development. You can imagine that years, decades of development can be overthrown by natural disaster overnight. So we are mindful of the fact that there is no successful development without building resilience of the nations and resilience of the people. Development should always take into consideration that there might be disaster, which can overthrow development achievements and it has to be risk informed, it has to take into consideration building the resilience. So, link between disaster risk reduction and sustainable development is increasingly understood, it is playing increasingly important role and we as development organization are putting disaster risk reduction in the center of our activities because we understand this inseparable relation between successful long term sustainable development and ability to deal with disasters.

Faik Uyanık: Our audience can contribute to this part via Twitter with #yeniufuklar hashtag and share their views and make their contributions on our topic today. The United Nations World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction, began on March 14 in Sendai, Japan, will continue till March 18. At the conference, the implementation of Hyogo Framework for Action, which was signed by 168 countries in 2005, over its ten year term will be reviewed and a detailed roadmap on disaster risk reduction for post 2015 will be presented. Rastislav Vrbensky, the Manager of UNDP Regional Hub, evaluates what has been achieved on disaster risk reduction over the last ten years, since Hyogo Summit:

Rastislav Vrbensky: Ten years ago,countries met again in Japan and discussed what needs to be done to reduce impact of disaster. And the number of countries you have mentioned, which participated clearly showed that disasters, they do not discriminate against anyone. You have disasters in all the countries and that is why countries, people take it very seriously and take very seriously also global agreement on what to do with it. Now, we are going to review what has been achieved over the last ten years. I have to say that, actually Hyogo Framework was very successful in attracting attention of the government and the countries to disaster risk reduction, especially disaster preparedness.

 However, we have to redefine the framework for new world. We see much more what we call ‘climate induced disasters’ which arguably linked to climate change. We have also… We know more, so it is always important to look back and agree again to have a new global agreement on how to prepare for disasters better and how to recover from eventual disasters quicker.

Faik Uyanık: The disaster risk reduction is not discussed only at the ongoing conference in Sendai. This issue will be on the agenda at significant international conferences throughout 2015. We listen to Rastislav Vrbensky:

Rastislav Vrbensky: This year is very special year because we do not only have Sendai Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction, we have also three other very important conferences. We are going to have, in September, Global Conference to define Post 2015 Development Agenda. And there are so called Sustainable Development Goals emerging which are going to be universal and those most likely 17 goals will be accepted by all the countries and will outline what a world is going to do in terms of development for next fifteen years until 2030. And we have also two other very important gatherings. It is a Climate Summit which is going to be in Paris in December this year, where again countries are going to get together and are going to discuss what to do with climate change, what is going to be the global agreement related to climate change. And there is one more conference which is also very important, which is going to take place in July in Addis in Ethiopia, which is going to discuss how we are going to finance all these commitments coming out of three conferences; disaster risk reduction, sustainable development and climate. And it is extremely important that everything is put together. Disaster risk reduction features very highly on the agenda of all these conferences. So, it is not only Sendai which is going to be dedicated specifically to disaster risk reduction. It is also about disaster risk reduction and its importance in other conferences and discussions related to sustainable development goals and climate change, in particular.

Faik Uyanık: The negative impacts of climate change are gradually increasing, disasters are everywhere and are experienced more and the risk is rising. Well, what should we do to reduce this risk and to make the results of our development efforts sustainable? We listen to Rastislav Vrbensky, the Manager of UNDP Regional Hub :

Rastislav Vrbensky: We are international organization but responsibility for the disaster is definitely, disaster risk reduction is definitely with national governments. That was one of the conclusions of Hyogo Conference that governments are the one to play primary role. And I am very happy that for instance here in Turkey, we have very good cooperation with AFAD, government agency responsible for disaster risk reduction. So, we are here to support effort of the governments. And that is why also new emerging framework in Sendai is negotiated between governments. In terms of link between climate change and disaster risk reduction, that is clear. We are starting to see more and more which is called climate change induced disaster. We see much high frequency of floods, we see much high frequency of droughts, we see mudslides in many areas which are significantly influencing development of the country. So, we need to do something with climate change and we have to be mindful of the link between climate change and disaster risk reduction.

On climate change basically there are two things you can do. Either you are reducing production of greenhouse gases, it is so called climate change mitigation. So, you are introducing measures through which economies are becoming low carbon. But in the same time because temperature is already rising and concentration of greenhouse gases is high so we are not going to be able to minimize or reduce climate change in fact absolutely. So, you have to also concentrate on adaptation. And we are helping countries, communities, people to be able to adapt to climate change and also to adapt to disasters, which are induced through climate change. So we are helping communities to be more resistant to floods, we are helping communities to deal with droughts. For instance, if they are dependent on agriculture production, we are helping them to produce varieties of fruits or vegetables which are more resistant to droughts, we are helping them to build settlements in such a way that they are not going to be affected by floods, they are not going to be affected by mudslides. In other words, helping not only to reduce the impact of climate change itself but also help countries, communities, people to be able to deal with potential natural disasters because they are not going to get away, that we know.

Faik Uyanık: We have come to the end of New Horizons prepared by UNDP in Turkey this week with the words of Rastislav Vrbensky, the Manager of UNDP Regional Hub. In this episode, we talked about disaster risk reduction which the international community will significantly focus on in 2015 and which is one of the most important necessities for sustainable development. This program has been recorded at the studio of Radyo İlef of Ankara University Communications Department. You can follow our program on FM frequency in İstanbul, on Açık Radyo (Open Radio) on Internet, on university radios in our broadcasting network, on iTunes, Soundcloud, TuneIn, Pure Connect, Yodiviki and Audioboo in podcast format, and also on tr.undp.org. Our user name for social media is undpturkiye. Hope to see you soon, good-bye!

Contributor:

Rastislav Vrbensky, the Manager of UNDP Regional Hub

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New Horizons

Young People Can Manage Their Money

Podcast 126

In this episode, we will talk about ‘I Can Manage My Money Project’, which was initiated in 2009 with the aim of increasing young people’s financial awareness.

Faik Uyanık: This is the New Horizons Podcasts prepared by United Nations Development Programme in Turkey. In this episode, we will talk about ‘I Can Manage My Money Project’, which was initiated in 2009 with the aim of increasing young people’s financial awareness. And our contributor is Sait Çetin, the Project Coordinator of ‘I Can Manage Money’. Welcome.

Sait Çetin:  I am glad to be here, thank you.

Faik Uyanık: Now, this project started in 2009 with the participation of the Turkish Ministry of Development, UNDP, Habitat Center for Development and Governance, Visa Europe Turkey and its member banks. The project offers a training that supports young people aged between 15-30 to budget their personal financial resources and use financial services correctly. I would, in fact, like to ask what have you done since 2009 but let me first ask the following: Why was such a project developed? What were the reasons behind it?

Sait Çetin: Thank you. We initiated a research in 2009 as you know a global financial crisis happened in 2008.  We conducted the research in 15 provinces in 2009. This research told us that especially young people are disadvantaged in financial matters. Young people have limited resources and they do not know how to use these limited resources. Actually that is the most basic reason why we started our project. We live on our pocket money in high school years, and there are scholarships in university years. What matters is not the amount of money, but to manage that money right. So, we started such a project to raise this awareness among the Turkish youth.

Faik Uyanık: Now, six years have passed, project has been continuing since 2009. It has many outputs, many observable results. Can we possibly mention those?

Sait Çetin: We firstly started the project in 15 provinces. Our initial goal was to reach six thousand young people within the first year, and reached this target. In time, as years passed, it progressed and enlarged. We both increased the number of cities and the number of young people we aimed to reach. As we complete the fifth year of the project in 2015, we see it reached 62 thousand young people with face-to-face trainings and in total 88 thousand young people with online trainings, which means that 26 thousand people, mainly young people benefited from the online training of the project.

Faik Uyanık: So, 62 thousand people were reached and the number adds up to 88 thousand when online trainings are taken into account. We are talking about a project which touched the lives of that many people. Let us emphasize there are online trainings available onhttp://paramiyonetebiliyorum.net. Our audience may get more detailed information about the Project from http://paramiyonetebiliyorum.net.Who are the ones delivering these trainings and how can we describe the change experienced by young people trained?

Sait Çetin: First of all, this project rests upon volunteer work. Our project has about 700 volunteer trainers. Those volunteers are part of a communication network named the National Youth Parliament and each is member of either a university club or association, or a youth council in their own provinces. We announce calls for applications, accept applications, pick our voluntary trainers evaluating those applications and deliver a 4-day-long training for those trainers about financial literacy. Among the titles of our training there are ‘My Budget’, ‘My Expenses’, My Debts’, ‘My Savings’.Those who are trained go back to their own locality and delivered the training to disadvantaged groups, mostly to young people. The training is not necessarily delivered for young people, women or middle-aged groups can also benefit. We actually have very unique examples. There are trainings delivered in prisons or trainings delivered for disabled persons. And we are getting significant results from our trainings. We are conducting researches for measuring the impact of the trainings. As a result of this research, we saw the ratio of those trained to make budget and define and reach to certain financial goals has been rising. While the ratio of young people who are making budget was around 50 percent, we are able to conclude, through the surveys conducted that it rises up to 80-90 percent following the 3-4 months after they are trained.

Faik Uyanık: Let us talk about the content of the trainings a little. What kind of training the participants of I Can Manage My Money project go through? What is the curriculum like? What should a participant expect from participating in the trainings?

Sait Çetin: We make many decisions about spending within the day and our money flies away our pocket without us noticing. This is in fact what the Project basically talks about: Control your Money. Because if you can manage your money, you can manage your life as well. We prepare our trainings from such a perspective. Our training is composed of 4 titles: ‘My Budget’, ‘My Expenses’, ‘My Debts’, ‘My Savings’. To exemplify we ask participant to distinguish between needs and wants before making a decision to purchase. We expect them to ask themselves the question “Do they want to buy it because it is something they need or do they tolerate spending because they want it?” There are very interesting examples. For instance we have one participant who could cover most of his/her rental costs only by saving the coins normally went to minor expenses such as chewing gum or minibus. Another one who originally had no camera though interested in photographing saved the money required for this hobby within 6 months, setting a financial goal. We receive very positive feedbacks in this sense.

Faik Uyanık: The Project had its impacts on public policies, too. The 10th National Development Plan had the statement “increasing financial awareness and spreading of financial education to every segment of society”. Can you briefly talk about that?

Sait Çetin: When we departed in 2009 one of our most important goals was transferring this life ability into public policy, for it to reach everyone. For example, to spread the project to all students in formal education by negotiating with the Ministry of Education. After the Ministry of Development became a partner of the Project, we exhibited a crucial example together with the contributions of Visa Europe Turkey and the United Nations Development Programme, which was then included in the 10th National Development Plan with a title as ‘Developing Financial Skills in Every Segment of Society’. After this policy statement, a strategy document was prepared with the coordination of Capital Markets Board of Turkey, SPK. Additionally, an incentive letter was sent by YÖK, the Higher Education Board, to all universities about increasing the financial literacy capacity of their freshmen year students. Such developments in public sector in fact demonstrate how the Project succeeds in creating a change.

Faik Uyanık: Our audience can contribute to this part via Twitter with #yeniufuklar hashtag and share their views and make their contributions on ‘I Can Manage My Money Project’. One last question. Until when ‘I Can Manage My Money’ project will last? What will be the next goals of the project?

Sait Çetin: ‘I Can Manage My Money’ project has been continuing for 5 years and seemingly it will continue for longer because it is a very successful project. All partners and beneficiaries are satisfied and it is a project we can see the results of. We mostly deliver individual financial literacy trainings. However, by adding financial literacy for entrepreneurs to our curricula in the fifth phase of the Project we also started to focus on the financial management of a business organization. To wit, we are trying to enlarge the project impact through new ideas and making every effort to be successful. The Project won several awards both in Europe-wide and worldwide. It is showed as a successful example by other institutions. Our face-to-face trainings continue to be delivered by our voluntary trainers in 72 provinces but those interested can have the training online from www.paramiyonetebiliyorum.net. We have a very good online training format. If they at the same time would like to participate in the trainings or wish to be a trainer themselves, it is a good idea to follow our social media accounts. They can follow us on “@paraniyonet” on Twitter or they can access information about project activities on Facebook fromhttp://facebook.com/paramiyonetebiliyorum and follow the relevant updates.

Faik Uyanık: In the middle of March, there is Global Money Week. What kind of activities are going to be made with I Can Manage My Money Project during this week?

Sait Çetin: March 9-17 is celebrated as the Global Money Week and there are many activities arranged to underline budgeting, knowing how to use money and financial awareness in several countries globally. Turkey constitutes one of the strongest aspects of this. We encourage our trainers as the Habitat Center for Development and Governance and other project partners to arrange similar activities during this week. Trainings will be delivered in different provinces in the same day. Additionally there will be university conferences. This topic will tried to be more visible through social media activities, and thereby and international visibility will be reached because those interested are able to follow from a single platform where activities of other countries can also be seen and among which Turkey will be placed on the top ranks. International visibility is crucial and we saw its benefits. Many other countries, after this successful project example started similar projects. To exemplify countries like Romania, Spain, Israel, Bulgaria either have already started the project or at the stage of starting a project with a similar logic to ours.

Faik Uyanık: Sait Çetin, thank you very much for being our guest in the programme today.

Sait Çetin: You are welcome.

Faik Uyanık: In this episode, we talked about the ‘I Can Manage My Money Project’ which started in 2009 with the aim of increasing financial awareness of young people. You can access more detailed information about the project from http://paramiyonetebiliyorum.net. Sait Çetin, our guest was the Project Coordinator of I Can Manage My Money. We have come to the conclusion of New Horizons prepared by UNDP Turkey this week. This program has been recorded at the studio of Radyo İlef of Ankara University Communications Department. You can follow our program on FM frequency in İstanbul, on Açık Radyo (Open Radio) on Internet, on university radios in our broadcasting network, on iTunes, Soundcloud, TuneIn, Pure Connect, Yodiviki and Audioboo in podcast format, and also on tr.undp.org. Our user name for social media is undpturkiye. Hope to see you soon, good-bye!

Contributor:

Sait Çetin, Project Coordinator of  ‘I Can Manage Money’

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New Horizons

Life is simpler with Internet

Podcast 119

In this episode, we talk about “Life is simpler with Internet” project where young volunteers train the elderly on digital literacy.

Faik Uyanık: This is the New Horizons Podcast Programme prepared by United Nations Development Programme in Turkey. In this episode, we talk about “Life is simpler with Internet” project where young volunteers train the elderly on digital literacy. Young people all around Turkey train the elderly on safe internet use, using e-mails, e-government applications, video communication, online banking and conscious use social media. Itır Akdoğan, Project Coordinator, talks about the objectives of the project:

Itır Akdoğan: Public and private services provided on the Internet make prople’s lives easier around the world and in Turkey. Although use of the Internet increases in our country, every citizen cannot benefit from this technology equally. Less developed cities and women above the age of 35 especially are the most disadvantaged group in this area. “Life is simpler with Internet” project targets exactly this group of people and support them to increase their use of the Internet. There are four primary objectives of the project which are increasing the rates of digital literacy in Turkey, supporting capacity building for the use of e-services provided by public and private sectors, raising public awareness on the use of social media tools, and lastly raising awareness on safe use of the Internet. As I mentioned earlier, the project aims to train especially women above the age of 35 and make them conscious Internet users and e-citizens.

Faik Uyanık: We were listening to Itır Akdoğan, Project Coordinator. “Life is simpler with Internet” project is implemented in partnership with TTNet, Habitat Development and Governance Association, and UNDP. The project’s website can be found at internetlehayatkolay.com. So, how is the Project put into practice? Itır Akdoğan tells us:

Itır Akdoğan: The Project is built on volunteerism. Young people between the ages of 15-30 train citizens above the age of 35. These young volunteers receive the trainings for trainers and become volunteers of the project. The project is implemented in 20 priority cities for development. In the pilot stage of the project, 123 young volunteers have been trained and nearly 3,000 citizens received the trainings in these 20 cities. The project will last for three more years. 35,000 citizens are planned to receive these trainings and made them more conscious Internet and e-service users until the end of 2017.

Faik Uyanık: We were listening to Itır Akdoğan. If you wish to contribute to this episode, you can share your thoughts on the topic using #newhorizons hashtag on Twitter. The project started in 2012. This year, it is aimed to introduce digital world to 12,000 people in 20 cities, which are Mersin, Kahramanmaraş, Karaman, Yozgat, Ordu, Çorum, Artvin, Amasya, Bayburt, Bartın, Manisa, Çanakkale, Batman, Şanlıurfa, Mardin, Şırnak, Erzincan, Bingöl, Erzurum and Hakkari. Mehmet Bilir, who lives in Şırnak, has given 19 Internet literacy trainings, has reached 450 citizens so far, together with his other volunteer friends. Mehmet talks about why he believes “Life is simpler with Internet” project is important:

Mehmet Bilir: Nowadays, people is more engaged with technology. We do everything through Internet. The lack of technology in especially Eastern and Southeastern parts of Turkey creates problems for our engagement in this kind of communication. NGOs have all their training programs through Internet so in this region it is a disadvantage in the sense that we have difficulties reaching electricity and Internet connection. So we live in a region that has a delayed access to technology. So given the circumstances, I thought if I volunteered to this project it would be a way to communicate with my people. After all, it has worked. We see this in every feedback.

Faik Uyanık: Mehmet Bilir, one of the trainers of the project was talking. Mehmet talks about what has changed in his life since he started giving trainings:

Mehmet Bilir: After all, that is the best part of the trainings. While you are teaching, you learn something as well. As I give these trainings to them about Internet use, this is kind of a revenge. It is so because I give trainings to people above the age of 35 who have given me a little chance to express myself until today. I give trainings to people who have a voice in the society. Giving trainings to people who had a word on me, who directed me, who trained me is kind of a revenge. They did not recognize me before but now I train them. So there is an ironic side of the story.

Faik Uyanık: Mehmet Bilir, a volunteer trainer of “Life is simpler with Internet”, finds the trainings entertaining and at the same time advantageous. Also, he talks about a group of persons with disabilities who took the trainings and changed their lives:

Mehmet Bilir: This group of persons with disabilities started to get organized the next day they started to take the trainings and they were thinking about how they could create a website of their own, how they could have their voices heard, etc. In Şırnak, where we live, there is nothing done for the benefit of persons with disabilitiese. No building is designed considering the persons with disabilities. So they started to think about what could be done about this, and they have contacted with the governor of the city. Suddenly, we started seeing that the building entrances are being redesigned for enabling persons with disabilities to enter without difficulties. All this is done by a campaign they ran on the Internet, and they found solution in a month. These examples are wonderful and they motivate us. I can say these are the best parts of the project.

Faik Uyanık: We have listened to Mehmet Bilir. Şengül Ayık, a volunteer trainer in Şanlıurfa, tells us that she volunteered to the project because she wanted the women in her region to benefit from the project. She talks about prejudices the people had about Internet before the training:

Şengül Ayık: While I was giving trainings, I have witnessed that women were in a way below the level than I thought they would be. I have encountered with women who have not seen a computer in their entire life. The common belief was the computer would explode if they touch it; the mouse and the keyboard would break down, etc. Their thoughts were; Internet is very bad, it leads to addiction, it kills your entire day, it consumes your whole time, and Internet is only for shopping or watching TV and so on. However, we showed them this was not the case. They believed the Internet was only for girls to find husbands, I have actually heard them say this. We have cleared this image of Internet they had in mind, and we have tried to tell them the benefits of Internet use. And I have witnessed that we were successful.

Faik Uyanık: Şengül tells us about her experiences she gained through trainings:

Şengül Ayık: This was my first project that I volunteer, actively work and express myself. I formerly trained children but I have never trained women. Most of these women were my relatives since I gave the trainings in my hometown. I was very anxious at first but I got over it eventually. It was normal because what we were doing was not easy; we were trying to teach them something they have never seen before and had prejudices about. So breaking down their prejudices motivated me a lot.

Faik Uyanık: We were listening to Şengül Ayık, a volunteer trainer of “Life is simpler with Internet” in Şanlıurfa. So, how can you volunteer for the project? Itır Akdoğan, Project Coordinator, gives the answer:

Itır Akdoğan: In this project, young people between the ages of 15-30 train citizens above 35. The implementing partner of the project is Habitat Development and Governance Association. Young people apply to the open announcements announced by us. As I said before, the project is implemented in 20 priority cities for development and where the Internet penetration is low. Young people living in these cities can apply to the project. There is a certain number of trainers determined to be achieved every year. Within the light of this target, selections are done through phone interviews. Once they pass the phone interview, young people are invited to trainings for trainers. Afterwards, they become volunteer trainers of the project and in the following year each trainer should give trainings to 100 people above the age of 35. They build up local partnerships for this, and of course we support them as three partners, TTNet, UNDP, and Habitat Development and Governance Association. Volunteerism is a great experience for the young people

Faik Uyanık: We have come to the conclusion of New Horizons this week with Itır Akdoğan’s words. In this episode, we talked about “Life is simpler with Internet” project where young volunteers train the elderly on digital literacy. This program has been recorded at the studio of Radyo İlef of Ankara University Communications Department. You can follow our program on FM frequency in İstanbul, on Açık Radyo (Open Radio) on internet, on university radios in our broadcasting network, on iTunes, Soundcloud, TuneIn, Yodiviki mobile application, Pure Connect and Audioboo in podcast format, and also on tr.undp.org. Our user name for social media is undpturkiye. Hope to see you soon, good-bye!

Contributors:

Itır Akdoğan, Project Coordinator
Mehmet Bilir, Volunteer Project Trainer
Şengül Ayık, Volunteer Project Trainer

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New Horizons

The Subject is Man

Podcast 115

In this episode, we will talk about human rights of women and a project in which man is the subject.

Faik Uyanık: This is the New Horizons Podcasts prepared by United Nations Development Programme in Turkey. In this episode, we will talk about human rights of women and a project in which man is the subject. And our contributor is Feyhan Evitan Canbay from UNDP Turkey. Welcome!

Feyhan Evitan Canbay: I am glad to be here, thank you for having me.

Faik Uyanık: Thank you for being here today. Let me say few words about the project, very briefly. Kahramanmaraş branch of Turkish Union of Workers of Religious Affairs, which is shortly named DİVASEN, implemented a project together with Başkent Women’s Platform. The project was supported by Sabancı Foundation Grant Programme which is a component of UN Joint Programme for Promoting the Human Rights of Women. The name of the project is ‘Subject is Man’. It aims to draw the attention to violence against women with a completely different approach. So, what is the difference between this project and the rest of the projects on violence against women? It evokes some ideas when we say ‘Subject is Man’, but let us hear it from you.

Feyhan Evitan Canbay: Up until to this date, in general, projects on violence against women have aimed to train, rehabilitate, empower or economically reinforce the victim rather than the perpetrator. One of the fundamental differences of this project is the fact that it is decided to implement a project which is not about the women who are exposed to violence but the men who committed violence. In the project, trainings were especially given to men, talking to them about how violence is harmful, how the results are catastrophic for the family and how they, themselves, are also affected negatively by all these.

Faik Uyanık: ‘Subject is Men’ project started in October 2013 and it ended in September 2014. What has been done as part of the project? Let us talk about activities and what do you think the most important outcome of the project is, since now we can talk about the results?

Feyhan Evitan Canbay: With the project, it was mainly planned to train 8 women and 8 men to be the trainers and these 8 women and 8 men gave trainings on preventing violence against women in coffee houses, mosques, trade associations of Maraş and its districts. This was the general activity of the project. The particularity of these trainers were that women trainers were Quran course teachers, men trainers were imams. So we had the opportunity to get in touch with a group of people that we don’t have a chance to communicate with so often, and talked about the concepts of gender equality and violence against women. For me, one of the most significant outcomes is the fact that within the scope of the project, 700-800 men were reached, meaning these men were trained. It was very hard for joint programme staff to reach these people. These people were gathered in coffee houses, mosques to meet with imams. This training was also given even in vegetable and fruit markets and chamber of city polices. Therefore, we had the opportunity to reach people that until today seemed unreachable to us. Plus, people who were not aware of the concepts of violence against women or gender equality were trained on these subjects by probably the most trusted people in their community, the imams.

Faik Uyanık: Did you have a chance to talk to beneficiaries of the project? What were their observations? What did they say?

Feyhan Evitan Canbay: Certainly. First of all, I should say that I congratulate and appreciate DİVASEN, project implementer and Başkent Women’s Platform, project partner as they formulated a very successful project. Although the imams were the facilitators on bringing those people together in a place, it was the women hafizs who provided the training to those people. Can you imagine? In front of a crowd of men, as you will guess the level of conservativeness within the group, a women hafiz comes out and talks about different forms of violence saying ‘Actually I was a child bride as well, but I was lucky that my husband let me go to school, he might not have let me’. Yes, we were present in all trainings, and talked to final beneficiaries. Surveys were conducted before and after the trainings. Many of them said that until today they were not aware of many of their behaviors were actually forms of violence. For instance, we heard one beneficiary saying ‘If the woman asked for money when I was leaving the house, I wouldn’t give money. I would say I didn’t have any, however now I realized that this is a form of economic violence. Now when I am leaving the house, I ask my wife weather she needs money or not’.

Faik Uyanık: So it is a training programme about all forms of violence, not only physical violence. This is a United Nations Joint Programme. Could you briefly tell us, which UN organizations were involved?

Feyhan Evitan Canbay: Right now, there are two UN Organizations within the Joint Programme. UNDP and UN Women are working together. However, we are not on our own, Sabancı University and Sabancı Foundation works with us. We have implementing partners from the public sector: Ministry of Internal Affairs, Ministry of Family and Social Policies, Ministry of National Education, and the Union of Municipalities. However, each institution is responsible for conducting one component. Sabancı Foundation and UNDP are responsible for conducting the Sabancı Foundation Grant Programme. At the same time UNDP is responsible for conducting the whole programme.

Faik Uyanık: The Programme has provided grants to many projects. More information can be found on bmopkadinhaklari.org. If you wish to share your views about this episode, please use #yeniufuklar hashtag on Twitter. So, Sabancı Foundation Grant Programme gives the grants. What was the grant’s contribution to this Project and others? There are many beneficiaries as we see in this example. What does this grant programme, given by United Nations Joint Programme and Sabancı Foundation, offer besides financial support?

Feyhan Evitan Canbay: Sabancı Foundation is the funding partner of the programme, meaning the institution providing the entire financial contribution. In addition it is responsible for technical implementation of the grant programme. We mainly conduct the programme with UNDP. We have made a mapping study in the early stages in our pilot cities. We have designed the grant programme according to the needs of the NGOs – especially NGOs working for women. So it has been a programme in accordance with the demand and in which NGOs can easily and freely express themselves and implement their own projects. In this respect, we believe that almost all projects we have granted became very successful. We have many good examples. Not only ‘Subject is Men’ project. Hopefully, we will talk about the other ones as well, in the future.

Faik Uyanık: We will tell other stories as well. Of course, it is not only about financial contribution. So we are talking about a programme that gives technical, educational and professional support in many areas whatever is needed. So again, one last question: Although the results of the project are pleasing, it is important to make the outcomes sustainable. What is going to be done in order to keep the good results coming or getting even better ones?

Feyhan Evitan Canbay: Actually, the project implementer DİVASEN ensured these trainings will continue. It has also applied to Sabancı Foundation Grant Programme’s second call for proposals. Right now, it is implementing another project, which will support the outcomes of these projects and that is to train 200 imams in and around Maraş. Training these 200 imams means to give basic and unbiased trainings to people in almost all mosques and other Quran courses about gender equality and violence against women.

Faik Uyanık: One last question. As you said, United Nations Joint Programme for Promoting the Human Rights of Women, supports many other projects similar to ‘Subject is Men’. And it works on many projects concerning human rights of women. The Joint Programme has started in September 2012. In our last season, we had an episode about Joint Programme. What are the new developments in the programme? Now ‘Subject is Men’ is finished; however the programme still continues for another year, am I right?

Feyhan Evitan Canbay: Yes. Our programme will continue with all its components until September 2015 however we made a second call for proposals in March 2014. Afterwards we gave grants to a total of eleven projects. Among these projects there are ones, which really step forward and become prominent. Of course, there were some in the first call for proposal but for instance now we have a project from Edirne, which will work on gender responsive budgeting and will include NGOs. There is one from Kastamonu, which will educate girl children between 15-18 years who go to pensions or stay in orphanages on gender equality, violence and sexual health. There is one project from Kayseri aiming to mentor the young girls from universities on how to be successful in their future professional life once they step into it. These are the first ones to come to my mind.

Faik Uyanık: Shortly, there are many upcoming projects.

Feyhan Evitan Canbay: Yes. We believe that we work on different dimensions of women’s empowerment within very different scales. One should also underline that budgets for these projects are not more than 35.000 TL. We have proven what can be done with 35.000 TL in a province, in our first call for proposal. I believe we can prove it this time as well.

Faik Uyanık: There are many enjoyable stories, which are available at bmopkadinhaklari.org and tr.undp.org. Thank you so much for contributing to our program. 

Feyhan Evitan Canbay: Thank you. 

Faik Uyanık: In this episode, we talked about human rights of women and a project in which man is the subject. Our guest was Feyhan Evitan Canbay from UNDP Turkey. New Horizons podcasts prepared by United Nations Development Programme in Turkey has come to an end for this week. This program has been recorded at the studio of Radyo İlef of Ankara University Communications Department. You can follow our program on FM frequency in İstanbul, on Açık Radyo (Open Radio) on internet, on university radios in our broadcasting network, on iTunes, Soundcloud, TuneIn, Pure Connect and Audioboo in podcast format, and also and on tr.undp.org. Our user name for social media is undpturkiye. Hope to see you soon, good-bye!

Contributor:

Feyhan Evitan Canbay, UNDP in Turkey

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New Horizons

How can we reduce vulnerabilities for human development?

Podcast 114

In this episode, we will talk about the Human Development Report 2014, titled ‘Sustaining Human Progress: Reducing Vulnerabilities and Building Resilience’, which focuses on persistent vulnerabilities threatening human development.

Faik Uyanık: This is the New Horizons Podcasts prepared by United Nations Development Programme in Turkey. In this episode, we will talk about the Human Development Report 2014, titled ‘Sustaining Human Progress: Reducing Vulnerabilities and Building Resilience’, which focuses on persistent vulnerabilities threatening human development. And our contributor is Cengiz Cihan, Senior Economist from UNDP in Turkey. Welcome!

Cengiz Cihan: I am glad to be here, thank you.

Faik Uyanık: We have said that persistent vulnerabilities threaten human development. Unless these vulnerabilities are addressed systematically through policies and social norms, progress will be neither equitable nor sustainable. This is the message. This subject is the core and main message of UNDP’s Human Development Report 2014, actually it is the main message. Let us start with the concept of vulnerability, if you wish. In this Report’s context, what should we understand from vulnerability?

Cengiz Cihan: Sure.In fact, the concept of vulnerabilities stands for some minorities in a society or some groups like the poor and the elderly that represent some differences and have certain problems. The main element here is that vulnerability signifies not to have access to certain knowledge and capabilities for getting basic social services, health services or education. Frankly, we observe that 1,5 billion people worldwide have serious problems in these three axes. We at United Nations wanted to draw the world’s attention to this sensitive and serious subject which should be seriously and carefully studied, especially after the global crisis.

Faik Uyanık: So we can say that in a sense, the concept of vulnerability is parallel to inequality. Joseph Stiglitz, Nobel-laureate, is among those who contributed to the Report and he even visited Turkey. The Report was launched globally in July. In September, we have introduced the Report in Turkey. Stiglitz expressed his thoughts in these words, let me read: “Reducing vulnerabilities is key to all kinds of agendas targeting human development. We should approach vulnerabilities with a broader and systematic view.” From this point of view, who is vulnerable and why?

Cengiz Cihan: As a matter of fact, Joseph Stiglitz is an academician who have formerly done very important studies on alternative elements and ways to calculate national income. Lately, he notably make remarks about this topic. The reason for this is that structural problems, which are thought to be only in least developed or developing countries, can actually also happen in developed and industrialized countries especially after the global crisis. It is so because when we look at the last 10 years period, fair income distribution with increase in wealth and richness is a matter not only in developing or least developed countries but also in developed and industrialized countries and regions. So this problem is not peculiar to a region or a geographical location. It is globally important because development or enrichment is a process and making it healthy and sustainable is not an issue only for a particular region. It requires us to collectively find and produce solutions for this. What Stiglitz tries to point out is that people from all around the world and all decision makers in the world should negotiate these issues together, find solutions for this problem together and actually solve them. If these issues are not solved, instabilities and gaps in income distribution will be increased. This will have a negative effect on all economies of the world.

Faik Uyanık: Poverty comes to the fore both as the cause and the result of vulnerabilities and inequalities. Although poverty is declining overall, almost 800 million people are at risk of falling back into poverty if setbacks occur. According to the Report, how can the vulnerabilities be addressed for all people to equally benefit from the progress achieved in development?

Cengiz Cihan: Here, we want to draw the attention to our Human Development Index and there are three components in the calculation of HDI. One of them aims to calculate the quality of living. Another component is about access to education at a minimum level and providing equality of opportunity in access to education. And the other component is about income levels in the process of development and enrichment of countries. There are severe gaps and setbacks in these three components for the vulnerable groups which we have talked about. These gaps can change depending on the region, countries and geographical locations. However, I would like to highlight again the fact that these gaps are not only seen in developing or least developed countries but also in industrialized countries; in the respect of education, fair access to health services and the share from national income. Hence, this is an indicator in which all these subjects are represented in all components. UN states that in 10 or 15 years time this will be the most critical topic for world’s economies. I think it is an important contribution for attracting people’s attention and show early signs of poverty, inequality in income distribution and related socio-economic collapse.

Faik Uyanık: We have mentioned this report was launched in July. 2014 Human Development Report focuses on vulnerabilities. In Turkey, we have introduced the Report in September. You can download the Report, its summary both in English and in Turkish and several info notes on the Report from tr.undp.org. If you wish to contribute to this episode, please use #YeniUfuklar hashtag and share your thoughts on Twitter. We continue. The most highlighted part of the Human Development Report is the Human Development Index. The Human Development Index 2013 has been announced in 2014’s Report. The countries of the top and bottom of the Human Development Index list have not changed dramatically. Norway, Australia, Switzerland, The Netherlands, USA are the countries at the top of the list. Sierra Leone, Chad, Middle African Republic, Democratic Congo and Niger remain at the bottom. In this year’s Human Development Index, what is Turkey’s position?

Cengiz Cihan: This year Turkey is the 69th among 187 countries.And the value is 0,759. This value changes between 0 and 1.

Faik Uyanık: And this index is calculated on 3 components, you have mentioned.

Cengiz Cihan: Yes, there are three components. One dimension is about progress countries made on health issues, life expectancy and living standards. Another one is about access to education. There two variables with respect to equality of opportunity in access to education; one of which is the mean years of schooling of the labor force. And the other one is the expected years of schooling. The third component is GNI per capita, which is calculated according to 2011 PPP $ following World Bank’s criteria. The average of these three components is calculated for 187 countries and a weighted average for each and every country is calculated accordingly and therefore the ranking is listed.

Faik Uyanık: The global launch was held in 24 July. In Ankara and Istanbul, the Report was introduced in early September. Of course it became so popular in global press as well as in Turkey. Academicians, diplomats, NGO representatives and experts discussed what the Report’s finding means for Turkey in these meetings. What was highlighted in these meetings, what were the headlines in the media about the Report? How was Turkey’s situation addressed?

Cengiz Cihan: There was a misunderstanding in Turkish media, expressing Turkey made a jump in HDI ranking by 11-12 place. However, this analysis or these kinds of comments are not very true because Human Development Index is calculated based on that particular year that it is being calculated and last year’s data are revised according to this year’s calculations and data. Therefore, the rankings between years should be compared with the same series of data which should be the most updated version. However, comparison tried to be made not within the same datasets but between different ones. This is not very true, as I said because the assumptions and the way numbers are calculated are very different.

Faik Uyanık: In addition, the methods may change. So there is no point in comparing rankings of two different years. One last question. Turkey has a place in the category of ‘high human development’ in this ranking. This is good for Turkey however there is also the category of ‘very high human development’. What does Turkey need to achieve to upgrade to this level? On which fields it needs to improve itself?

Cengiz Cihan: We need to underline the structural issues here. In the Human Development Index, we see that these structural issues are essentially included. For instance we look at education, the mean years of schooling of labor force is still not sufficient to acquire a profession. The mean years of schooling in Turkey is 7,6. When we look at those countries that are in ‘very high human development’ category, we see that the mean years of education is about 21-22 years, which is even above the university level. That is of course an indicator showing that in those countries human quality is above average, its share from the income is much more qualified, growth is much more inclusive, there is less disruption in income distribution and there is less poverty. There is also a lot of work that need to be done in the health sphere. We have many shortfalls in infrastructure and investments that needs to be integrated. If Turkey performs a more sustainable and qualified development, this will contribute to the development more. However, we need to remember that this is not a process that can be completed in a day. Implementing these structural reforms will take some time. If we can successfully implement the process, I believe that our country has a bright future.

Faik Uyanık: It always takes some time to see the results of structural reforms in these kinds of index as it is the case in all social indicators. Thank you so much for being here.

Cengiz Cihan: Thank you so much for inviting me.

Faik Uyanık: Our guest was Cengiz Cihan, Senior Economist from UNDP Turkey. In this episode we talked about the Human Development Report 2014. We have come to the end of New Horizons prepared by UNDP Turkey. This program has been recorded at the studio of Radyo İlef of Ankara University Communications Department. You can follow our program on FM frequency in İstanbul, on Açık Radyo (Open Radio) on internet, on university radios in our broadcasting network, on iTunes, Soundcloud, TuneIn, Pure Connect and Audioboo in podcast format, and also and on tr.undp.org. Our user name for social media is undpturkiye. Hope to see you soon, good-bye!

Contributor:

Cengiz Cihan, Senior Economist, UNDP in Turkey

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